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Zuckerberg's privacy manifesto is actually about messages

You should be forgiven if you read Mark Zuckerberg's Wednesday post about Facebook moving to "A Privacy-Minded Vision for Social Networking" and thought it was either a death-bed conversion, a cynical trick to avoid regulation and calm users , or even just an absurd muzzle that the company does not intend to perform (much like the "Clear History" feature it announced nearly a year ago, which has not yet occurred). I know that at various points I thought that all three above and many other things to start. It's also possible that you took Zuckerberg on his words, as formerly Microsoft Wunderman Steven Sinofsky did and credited him by recognizing the way the winds blow and moving there with thoughtful and hasty. In fact, Zuckerberg's essay probably wasn't about any of these things, nor was it about integrity at all (more about the latter). 19659003] It was about WeChat, Wha tsApp and iMessage. Zuckerberg's post, minus PR, was a product map. It aims to adapt its operations to counter one of the only remaining competition threats against Facebook and Instagram: messaging. And it was a smart way to dress up that pivot as a consumer-friendly privacy game. Win win! Molly Wood (@mollywood) is an editor of ideas at WIRED and host and senior editor for Marketplace Tech a daily national radio broadcast covering technology activities. She has covered the technology industry at CNET, The New York Times and in various print, television, digital and audio formats for almost 20 years.…

You should be forgiven if you read Mark Zuckerberg’s Wednesday post about Facebook moving to “A Privacy-Minded Vision for Social Networking” and thought it was either a death-bed conversion, a cynical trick to avoid regulation and calm users , or even just an absurd muzzle that the company does not intend to perform (much like the “Clear History” feature it announced nearly a year ago, which has not yet occurred).

I know that at various points I thought that all three above and many other things to start.

It’s also possible that you took Zuckerberg on his words, as formerly Microsoft Wunderman Steven Sinofsky did and credited him by recognizing the way the winds blow and moving there with thoughtful and hasty.

In fact, Zuckerberg’s essay probably wasn’t about any of these things, nor was it about integrity at all (more about the latter). 19659003] It was about WeChat, Wha tsApp and iMessage.

Zuckerberg’s post, minus PR, was a product map. It aims to adapt its operations to counter one of the only remaining competition threats against Facebook and Instagram: messaging. And it was a smart way to dress up that pivot as a consumer-friendly privacy game. Win win!

Molly Wood (@mollywood) is an editor of ideas at WIRED and host and senior editor for Marketplace Tech a daily national radio broadcast covering technology activities. She has covered the technology industry at CNET, The New York Times and in various print, television, digital and audio formats for almost 20 years. (Ouch.)

Facebook, the core product, collapses. I know it seems like a strong statement given the company’s 2 billion users, but in fact, News Feed is a wasteland of reposted memories, disruptive propaganda and single childhood. US users abandon it by millions, user development is flat and personal sharing has gone down for several years.

Regulations and even antitrust investigations are threatening. Even a handful of advertisers are starting to move forward, and the company’s brand reputation is falling rapidly. A new Axio’s survey added 94 out of 100, above all US government, Trump.org, Phillip Morris, and Wells Fargo.

Yes, Instagram looks like the next best hope for the empire, and certainly many users will leave Facebook landing at Insta. But it’s still a distant second when it comes to usage, and while Facebook claims high-end advertisers against stories, they are yielding significantly less revenue than news news. In addition, as Instagram’s product map appears more and more like Facebook, the app can become much less appealing.

And if you really look at what teenagers do especially, contains social media, but with almost every action they are subtitling. The biggest threat to Facebook and Instagram is the message, and that is why, if you remove the entire window cover for privacy, this section is most important:

“Today we already see private messages, ephemeral stories and small groups are By far the fastest growing areas of online communication, there are a number of reasons for this: many people prefer the intimacy of communicating one-on-one or with a few friends, and people are more cautious about having a permanent record of what they have shared. expect us all to be able to make things like payments privately and securely. “

China’s WeChat is the model that Zuckerberg almost certainly has in mind. It has about one billion users. combines messages and calls with apps, payments, communications and commerce; and works mainly as a proxy for the internet for their users – who spend well over an hour a day with the app (more time than they spend on Facebook). This is almost exactly what Zuckerberg describes to build for the next few years.

You can see why. WeChat’s ads in the app and processing fees on payment transactions make it billions of dollars for the parent company Tencent. It even has a thriving community of creators and a lucrative social flow called WeChat Moments. It is ubiquitous in China and takes a reduction of almost all businesses operating in its ecosystem.

But despite the fact that there are parts of such a strategy, Facebook is still far from rolling out a “super app” like WeChat. WhatsApp and Facebook Messenger, if combined, get it close with stickers and ephemeral messages. It can migrate over Stories and find out how slow you can integrate ads, but the payments and app features are still at best.

Apple has the best place to start a WeChat-like product, as it already has an app ecosystem, developers who trust it, lots of stored credit cards and a complete payment system. In fact, last year I wrote that Apple would release iMessage over platforms and turn it into a social network that could really do a little in Facebook. But the company has so far only locked iMessage on iDevices.

That does not mean that Facebook is constantly in the world.

Mobile phone manufacturers, carriers, and standard agencies are distributing RCS, or Rich Communication Services, as a possible replacement for subtitles, and Google submits it all to Android phones. RCS messages work more like the chat apps we are talking about, where you can send videos, full size pictures, audio messages, make video calls, make simple group messages, get read receipts – basically all the tidbits of iMessage or WhatsApp, but in standard text program.

All this is a problem for Facebook. We turn off social media – it turns out that is an upper limit on how much “information wants to be shared.” We close the door on the complete fire hose of social media in favor of controlled environments, more personal interactions, benefits and what originally made Facebook fun: talking to our friends. So yes, Zuckerberg has tied the trend line carefully, and all he really did on Wednesday was that Facebook’s products will try to develop in that direction.

Now let’s get back to this confidentiality. Zuckerberg’s essay gives rise to privacy protection, encryption, security and ephemerality. It’s not like WIRED’s publisher Issie Lapowsky and Nick Thompson point out that neither will it be data collection and targeted advertising. There is a lot of it on WeChat, and there can be a lot on the integrated message site that Zuckerberg presents.

The fact that your individual messages can be encrypted in transit does not in any way prevent Facebook The device from knowing who your friends are, where you go, what links you click, what apps you use, what you buy, what you pay for and where, which companies you communicate with, which games you play and what information you may have given to Facebook or Instagram in the past.

After all, even if you turn off the tracking, Facebook still tracks you. And remember that this paper comes from a guy who, even after checking out all the problems he has had lately in a visit to Harvard last month, still couldn’t stop himself from fantasizing about how amazing it would be Be that jacket directly in his user’s brains.

A private and complete messaging application will not necessarily change a case on how Facebook works over the web, in terms of tracking and retargeting. This does not mean that Facebook will not dial the phone number of someone you report using their future apps and use them to compile shadow profiles or recruit new users.

In fact, nowhere in more than 3000 words such as Zuckerberg published on Wednesday, he says that users will ultimately control their own data or have the ability to reduce the amount of data they share with Facebook or delete the information or use anonymous or pay subscription fees to reduce or eliminate ad tracking

It sounds good, but I already have iMessage, so I think I will pass.


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