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Widespread Testing Begins on Malaria Vaccine That Is Only Partly Effective

Many children died in the 2009-2014 clinical trials, because they could be diagnosed and treated quickly, and hospital care with blood transfusions for severe anemia was readily available. The current rollout will cost about $ 50 million. It is funded by the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria; Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance; Unitaid, and the countries involved. The W.H.O. and Path, a nonprofit group in Seattle that has collaborated with GSK on the vaccine since 2001, will contribute expertise. Glaxo will donate 10 million doses or vaccine Early next year, a clinical trial of another malaria vaccine, PfSPZ, is scheduled to begin on Bioko Island, just off the western coast of central Africa. That vaccine, made by Sanaria, a biotech company in Rockville, Md., Uses whole malaria parasites that are irradiated and then removed from the mosquitoes' salivary glands. This vaccine, too, has limitations. It must be delivered by intravenous injection, must be stored in liquid nitrogen and require very high doses of parasites. Its efficacy rate has fluctuated significantly during its development. Early testing on a handful of volunteers suggested it could be 100 percent effective. But later tests showed overall efficacy rates of 55 percent, in 2016, and 64 percent, in 2017, when used on small numbers of subjects who were “challenged” by intentional bites from infected mosquitoes. In a 2017 trial in about 100 adults in Mali, the efficacy rate was 29 percent. The new trial, initially in about 2,000 people, will be paid for…

Many children died in the 2009-2014 clinical trials, because they could be diagnosed and treated quickly, and hospital care with blood transfusions for severe anemia was readily available.

The current rollout will cost about $ 50 million. It is funded by the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria; Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance; Unitaid, and the countries involved.

The W.H.O. and Path, a nonprofit group in Seattle that has collaborated with GSK on the vaccine since 2001, will contribute expertise. Glaxo will donate 10 million doses or vaccine

Early next year, a clinical trial of another malaria vaccine, PfSPZ, is scheduled to begin on Bioko Island, just off the western coast of central Africa.

That vaccine, made by Sanaria, a biotech company in Rockville, Md., Uses whole malaria parasites that are irradiated and then removed from the mosquitoes’ salivary glands.

This vaccine, too, has limitations. It must be delivered by intravenous injection, must be stored in liquid nitrogen and require very high doses of parasites.

Its efficacy rate has fluctuated significantly during its development. Early testing on a handful of volunteers suggested it could be 100 percent effective. But later tests showed overall efficacy rates of 55 percent, in 2016, and 64 percent, in 2017, when used on small numbers of subjects who were “challenged” by intentional bites from infected mosquitoes.

In a 2017 trial in about 100 adults in Mali, the efficacy rate was 29 percent.

The new trial, initially in about 2,000 people, will be paid for by the government of Equatorial Guinea and three oil companies whose employees work in high-malaria areas. [19659025]
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