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Wi-Fi Finder hotspot locator exposes passwords

Picture here: you are worried when you realize that you are close to reaching your mobile data capsule and you know that you are crossing the border means extra charges. You can put down the phone. Whoa, pump the breaks. Let's not be gone. Instead, you're looking for public Wi-Fi hotspots in the area. Your smartphone can search for available networks, but you choose to download a more robust app that displays nearby hotspots along with other handy information such as passwords and their locations on a map. But it's a hiccup. This particular app, which has been downloaded by tens of thousands of people, revealed only millions of network passwords &#821 1; many of which should not have had access in the first place. Another exposed database with password In another exposed database, a security researcher found it for Wi-Fi Finder . It was filled with about 2 million plaintext network passwords from all over the world, all available to view and download. Thousands of these networks exist in the United States The researcher who made the discovery told TechCrunch about the database, and they have spent a couple of weeks trying to contact the developer Proofusion, which is believed to be based in China. Nice. There has been no response, but when they reach DigitalOcean (host), the database was quickly taken down. Only the password would be bad enough, right? You would think so, but there was other sensitive information in the database like a network name (SSID)…

Picture here: you are worried when you realize that you are close to reaching your mobile data capsule and you know that you are crossing the border means extra charges. You can put down the phone. Whoa, pump the breaks. Let’s not be gone.

Instead, you’re looking for public Wi-Fi hotspots in the area. Your smartphone can search for available networks, but you choose to download a more robust app that displays nearby hotspots along with other handy information such as passwords and their locations on a map.

But it’s a hiccup. This particular app, which has been downloaded by tens of thousands of people, revealed only millions of network passwords &#821

1; many of which should not have had access in the first place.

Another exposed database with password

In another exposed database, a security researcher found it for Wi-Fi Finder . It was filled with about 2 million plaintext network passwords from all over the world, all available to view and download. Thousands of these networks exist in the United States

The researcher who made the discovery told TechCrunch about the database, and they have spent a couple of weeks trying to contact the developer Proofusion, which is believed to be based in China. Nice. There has been no response, but when they reach DigitalOcean (host), the database was quickly taken down.

Only the password would be bad enough, right? You would think so, but there was other sensitive information in the database like a network name (SSID) and exact geolocation. There was no contact information for network owners included in the database, but the exact geolocation part is a problem because it basically points out your network on a map.

Importance of your home network

Think of your home network for one minute and how important it is. It connects your connected devices together and manages all aspects of your online activity. You know that you have a super-complicated password for your Wi-Fi network, along with firewalls and no ports left for hackers to exploit. Yes, you are convinced that you are always one step ahead of any attackers.

Then there is the app I mentioned that you just downloaded to use during your travels. Looks comfortable, but wait – it wants access to the various Wi-Fi passwords stored on your smartphone. It also wants your location and access to other sensitive information.

Somehow it sounds completely up and up so you give the app access to all possible permissions. Oh.

A convenient hotspot search app

Hotspot find app WiFi Finder is for Android devices. It is available through the Google Play Store and has been downloaded over 100,000 times.

When you set it up, you want access to your saved Wi-Fi password list, probably because not all public hotspots are open and available without a password Let’s say you’ve stayed in a hotel or visited a coffee shop where you got the password to access their Wi-Fi. Now login information is stored on your device and can help others access the same network when you share these references with the app.

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Here’s the problem. Apparently, the app cannot distinguish the difference between public hotspots and personal home networks, so it would upload all the details in the database – a database that has recently been shown to be completely exposed and unprotected.

Protect Your Network and Other Data

The information leaked from this database may be a problem, but only if you are designated by one would be cybercrime. Again, this is where the geolocation data is the problem solver. If nearby, an attacker may be able to connect to your network to spread malicious code and change your router’s settings or other devices connected to it. In terms of devices, you can only think of a hacker’s potential access to your security cameras.

And if an attacker crushes with your DNS server, you can unknowingly be sent to malicious websites that would cause even more problems. Also, any unencrypted traffic that contains other passwords and private data would also be in danger. On a page number, you should always look for “S” in the URL (https: //) when you visit websites.

If you have downloaded this app, delete it and change any network passwords for which you are responsible. To be on the safe side, take a look at your network traffic for anything that looks suspicious or not in place.

Considering dubious apps, the Google Play Store has developed a reputation for letting all types of riff raff in, from adware to malware. This app, WiFi Finder, does not just want network info, but access to your location and contacts – and the ability to change data on your Android smartphone. No app, not this or anyone else, needs that kind of access to your phone. If you come across something that does, deny and remove. Click or click here to find out how best you can manage permissions on your Android.

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Do your research because you can’t trust Google to do it for you. Read privacy policies and reviews from other users before downloading apps. Find the app’s developer and where they are.

These are things that Google should do, but they are busy ignoring their app-vetting process and bad YouTube algorithms to focus on the key issues: data mining and manufacturing money. At least they are consistent.

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Did you know that there is a way for developers to install apps on your iPhone without going through careful wetting?

Click or click here to find out how to protect your devices

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