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Why did a little Guatemalan girl die after crossing the border with the United States? | American news

After a last stretch of foot along a gravel road through the high desert, a father and his young daughter crossed into the United States at the end of a 2000 mile journey through Mexico. It was after dark and they were part of a group of 163 people, which apparently included dozens of single-parent children, who had made it to Antelope Wells, New Mexico, were considered the most remote site along the entire southern boundary of the United States. Just over 27 hours later, despite the desperate efforts to save her, seven-year-old Jakelin Amei Rosemery Caal Maquin was dead. And while the results of an autopsy may not be known for a few days, the circumstances of her sad death in the repository of the US Border Bureau The Office are already seized as evidence both for and against the Trump Administration's hard attitude toward immigration. Donald Trumps followers sound blame with a parent who would risk his child's safety on a dangerous journey. The critics of the president's fear-mongering talk about an "invasion" at the Mexican border blames his policy to drive people into increasingly desperate measures. As the hometown department (DHS) begins an investigation there are gaps in history and some important details are contested by Jakelin's family. According to DHS, her dead days followed her journey through the desert without enough food or water. A Washington Post report said the border police agency quoted statements from his father. An anonymous officer for Customs and Border Protection…

After a last stretch of foot along a gravel road through the high desert, a father and his young daughter crossed into the United States at the end of a 2000 mile journey through Mexico.

It was after dark and they were part of a group of 163 people, which apparently included dozens of single-parent children, who had made it to Antelope Wells, New Mexico, were considered the most remote site along the entire southern boundary of the United States.

Just over 27 hours later, despite the desperate efforts to save her, seven-year-old Jakelin Amei Rosemery Caal Maquin was dead.

And while the results of an autopsy may not be known for a few days, the circumstances of her sad death in the repository of the US Border Bureau The Office are already seized as evidence both for and against the Trump Administration’s hard attitude toward immigration.

Donald Trumps followers sound blame with a parent who would risk his child’s safety on a dangerous journey. The critics of the president’s fear-mongering talk about an “invasion” at the Mexican border blames his policy to drive people into increasingly desperate measures.

As the hometown department (DHS) begins an investigation there are gaps in history and some important details are contested by Jakelin’s family.

According to DHS, her dead days followed her journey through the desert without enough food or water. A Washington Post report said the border police agency quoted statements from his father.

An anonymous officer for Customs and Border Protection (CBP) also told the Post that her dad did not wake up the alarm about her worsening fever while in storage. “There were plenty of opportunities if her dad had noticed anything and brought the attention of the agents,” said the official.

Her father, Nery Gilberto Caal Cuz, 29, who promised the urgent respondents’ efforts to save his daughter, later insisted in a lawyer’s statement that he looked after her on the trip and made sure she was fed and had water.



A heart-shaped sign with the name Jakelin Amei Rosmey Caal Maquin in her family house in Raxruhá, Guatemala announces her death. Photo: Johan Ordóñez / AFP / Getty Images

Family members in Raxruhá, the small village of Guatemala, said that Jakelin, who celebrated his seventh birthday on the trip north through Mexico, had received his first pair of shoes for the trip.

Grandfather Domingo Caal said that the family got $ 5 a day served harvested corn and beans and Jakelin’s father hoped to send money home from the United States.

Associated Press described the family house, a “small wooden house with a thatched roof, dirt flooring, some bedding and a cooking pit, where Jakelin used to sleep with his parents and three siblings. The brothers are barefoot, their feet are chopped with mud and their clothes In a tatters, a heart made of wood and the plastic piece tells Jakelin’s death. “

Her grandfather said that the trip had taken about a week and her father had paid a human trafficker to get them across the border, making their intersection in a desolate part of the New Mexico wilderness called Bootheel, where the border crosses the mountainous Chihuahua desert.

Ruben Garcia, head of the Annunciation House guard in El Paso, Texas, where her dad now watches, said father and daughter were not part of one of the so-called “caravans” of people who went north over long distances.

“He came up as part of a smaller group who then gathered with other people on the way here,” said Garcia. “He travels by bus and there were 40 people, that’s what he told us.”

Tekandi Paniagua, Guatemalan Consul in Del Rio, Texas, said that Jakelin’s father told him that the group they traveled with was turned off in Mexico about a 90 minute walk from the border.

They passed the boundary at Antelope Wells, consisting of only four buildings, the border office port, two houses and a trailer. At 4.665 feet, it is higher than Ben Nevis, Britain’s highest mountain, even though it is sunbathing, and even in December, it normally reaches the 76F (24C) daytime temperature.

DHS gave a timeline of what happened to the group of 163 who crossed the border on Tuesday 5 December and was stopped by three border agents at 21.15. It is said to be the most remote of 43 entrance ports along the border and those who cross here are usually “giving ups” who are in front of border agents.



Central American immigrants are holding a demonstration after Jakelin’s death. Photo: Guillermo Arias / AFP / Getty Images

But the Trump policy to place border services on international bridges to block people from entering the United States land has increased the number of trips to more dangerous and remote places.

Informal “waiting lists” to claim asylum arrest people, but instead of waiting in the ports for days or weeks at a time, often in gossip or without protection, frustrated asylum seekers choose to cross the border between the ports.

The group of Jakelin and her father were in relocated to a covered area and obviously were interviewed and observed “to identify any health or safety problems to ensure that they receive the necessary medical care”.

DHS said during the screening: “The father denied that he or his daughter was ill. This denial was registered on Form I-779, signed by the father. At that time, they were offered water and food and had access to toilets.”

Father’s Lawyers said in a statement that the form was in English, a language that her father did not speak or read. He communicated with border agents in Spanish but he speaks mainly on the Mayan Qqqqqi language. “It’s unacceptable for any authority to keep people in custody signing actions in a language that they clearly do not understand,” said the statement.

The agents decided to transport the large group by bus to the nearest border patrol station at Lordsburg, 90 minutes away. The bus arrived and at 18 minutes before midnight took the first group of 50, all single children.

At 4:00 the bus returned to the other group. “About 0500, as the second group of prisoners – including the child and the father – prepared to resign … the father advised border police agents that his children had become ill and vomited,” said DHS.

Agents asked for an emergency medical team to meet the bus when it arrived at Lordsburg just before noon. 6.30.

“At that time the father announced that the child was not breathed,” said the statement. Border Patrol Emergency Medical Team requested an ambulance. “At this point, her temperature was 105.9 degrees. The medical care provider revived the child twice.”

The ambulance arrived quickly, but it was decided to evacuate the girl by helicopter as the road to El Paso, Texas, was four hours.

A helicopter arrived at 7.30, left 18 minutes later with the girl aboard, reaching the Providence Children’s Hospital in El Paso, Texas at 8.51.



Domingo Caal, 61, holds a smartphone showing a photo of his grandson Jakelin. Photo: Oliver de Ros / AP

Jakelin went from ER to pediatric intensive care unit. “At the hospital, his daughter arrested a couple of times and they could revive her,” said Garcia, referring to her heartbeat.

However, as the DHS statement records, “Unfortunately, she left at 00.35 on December 8, 2018. The original indication from Providence Hospital is that she passed because of Sepsischock. Her father was with her.”

“Jakelins Dad is grateful to the many first respondents who tried to save Jakelin’s lives in New Mexico and Texas, “says a statement from his lawyers.

However, it is important to clarify some important points they continued. “Before I entered CBP custody and contrary to the report that Jakelin had not eaten or had water for several days, Jakelin had not crossed the desert for several days.

” Jakelin’s father took care of Jakelin, made sure she got fed up and had enough water. She and her father sought asylum from border police as soon as they crossed the border. She did not suffer from water or food shortage before reaching the border. “

Attorneys for the family require a thorough investigation of Jakelin’s death.

When the White House became the issue of Friday if they took any responsibility for the girl’s death, spokesman Hogan Gidley said:” Does the administration take responsibility for a parent taking a child on a trip through Mexico to get to the country? No. “

Garcia, who runs the Annunciation Guard, said he believed that the Trump administration had intentionally introduced barriers to people making it difficult for them to exercise a right to claim asylum guaranteed by US law and international law. 19659002] He said, “What people are doing is that they go farther and farther and that’s dangerous. It jeopardizes the lives and welfare of families and obviously by children and it is very confusing. “

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