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WHO. Says limited or no screen time for children under 5 years

Dr. Hill said W.H.O. seems to be "applying the precautionary principle and saying," If we do not know it is good, and there is reason to believe it is bad, why do it? "" A.A.P. begins to consider the next set of guidelines, says Dr. Hill. "It is certainly possible when we revise our recommendations and when additional data becomes available we can boast that direction in the future," he said. "But it is difficult to say without a comprehensive literature review, which is what informs our policy." World Health Organization Guidelines go beyond A.A.P's recommendations. Dr. Fiona Bull, a program manager for monitoring and population-based prevention of non-communicable diseases at the WHO, led an expert group that developed the guidelines. "Improved physical activity, reduced downtime, and ensuring quality sleep in young children will improve their physical, mental health and well-being and help prevent childhood obesity and associated diseases later in life," Dr. Bull said in a statement. [19659002] The researchers also recommended that children under 5 should not be attached to prams or highchairs or strapped to the caregiver's back for more than an hour at a time, and children between 1 and 5 years of age should be given three hours of physical activity per day and at least 10 hours of sleep per night. . According to the WHO, the number of overweight people worldwide has nearly tripled since 1974. The incidence of childhood obesity, once considered a plague of rich nations, is dramatically increasing in low…

Dr. Hill said W.H.O. seems to be “applying the precautionary principle and saying,” If we do not know it is good, and there is reason to believe it is bad, why do it? “” A.A.P. begins to consider the next set of guidelines, says Dr. Hill.

“It is certainly possible when we revise our recommendations and when additional data becomes available we can boast that direction in the future,” he said. “But it is difficult to say without a comprehensive literature review, which is what informs our policy.”

World Health Organization Guidelines go beyond A.A.P’s recommendations.

Dr. Fiona Bull, a program manager for monitoring and population-based prevention of non-communicable diseases at the WHO, led an expert group that developed the guidelines.

“Improved physical activity, reduced downtime, and ensuring quality sleep in young children will improve their physical, mental health and well-being and help prevent childhood obesity and associated diseases later in life,” Dr. Bull said in a statement. [19659002] The researchers also recommended that children under 5 should not be attached to prams or highchairs or strapped to the caregiver’s back for more than an hour at a time, and children between 1 and 5 years of age should be given three hours of physical activity per day and at least 10 hours of sleep per night. .

According to the WHO, the number of overweight people worldwide has nearly tripled since 1974. The incidence of childhood obesity, once considered a plague of rich nations, is dramatically increasing in low and middle income countries, especially those in Africa and Asia.

The organization said the failure to meet current physical activity recommendations is a responsible for more than five million deaths globally every year across all age groups.

“What we really need to do is take back play for children,” says dr. Juana Willumsen, who works with obesity in childhood at the WHO, said in a statement. “This is about making the transition from sedentary time to playing time, while you sleep.”

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