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When Putin is around, GPS goes to Haywire, studying thoughts

As Russian President Vladimir Putin and a convoy of construction vehicles rolled over one of the most controversial new bridges in the world on May 15, 2018, something funky on ships anchored near the Kerch section. The vessels "GPS system suddenly began to indicate that they were actually 65 kilometers away, on land, in the middle of an airport. The event is one of many highlighted in a new report that found the Kremlin" spoofed "global positioning system, or GPS, to effectively place a bubble around Putin or attributes associated with him The researchers, with a nonprofit named C4ADS and the University of Texas at Austin, used public marine GPS databases, as well as a GPS monitoring unit at the International Space Station to The annual study identified a pattern in which GPS units near Putin and his entourage suddenly gave incorrect readings, and the researchers also identified five buildings in connection with the Kremlin which seemed to exploit the technique on a rolling basis. The researchers are theory that One reason why "spoofing" is deployed is to protect Putin and other Russian officials from attacks or surveillance of drones Who rely on GPS "The purpose of this spoofing activity was likely to prevent unauthorized civil drone activity as a VIP protection measure," they wrote in the study. However, there is a drawback to creating a GPS bubble around a world leader, says Todd Humphreys, a technical professor at the University of Texas at Austin, who was involved in the…

As Russian President Vladimir Putin and a convoy of construction vehicles rolled over one of the most controversial new bridges in the world on May 15, 2018, something funky on ships anchored near the Kerch section.

The vessels “GPS system suddenly began to indicate that they were actually 65 kilometers away, on land, in the middle of an airport.

The event is one of many highlighted in a new report that found the Kremlin” spoofed “global positioning system, or GPS, to effectively place a bubble around Putin or attributes associated with him The researchers, with a nonprofit named C4ADS and the University of Texas at Austin, used public marine GPS databases, as well as a GPS monitoring unit at the International Space Station to

The annual study identified a pattern in which GPS units near Putin and his entourage suddenly gave incorrect readings, and the researchers also identified five buildings in connection with the Kremlin which seemed to exploit the technique on a rolling basis.

The researchers are theory that One reason why “spoofing” is deployed is to protect Putin and other Russian officials from attacks or surveillance of drones Who rely on GPS

“The purpose of this spoofing activity was likely to prevent unauthorized civil drone activity as a VIP protection measure,” they wrote in the study.

However, there is a drawback to creating a GPS bubble around a world leader, says Todd Humphreys, a technical professor at the University of Texas at Austin, who was involved in the study. It also makes it easier to keep track of Putin.

“What is ironic, if you look at these patterns, and if you coordinate it with Russian leader’s movements, it seems like you have a Putin detector, Humphreys says. In other words, if you discover spoofing, there is A good chance that Putin might be nearby.

The technology can also be dangerous. The 24 shipping vessels that reported the Kerch bridge incident were otherwise unaffected, but Humphreys said a similar tactic in Syria could affect aircraft, requiring functioning GPS

The researchers identified Russian equipment in Syria which released what Humphreys described as “a completely different signal, one that was much much stronger, but not spoofing. “The signal proved to be jamming of GPS units on aircraft, causing their navigation systems to be unusable.

When the same tactics were deployed during large-scale Russian military exercises in Eastern Europe, the civilian effects were reported according to the report.

” Norway and Finland reported Serious GPS disturbances affecting commercial and mobile multi-day routes “, the report said.

Humphreys said the US government has similar capabilities, but when using or testing spoofing or jamming equipment, it typically notifies seafarers and pilots. [1

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