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What you lacked in the Mueller report

That's what happens when two plus years of research work is distilled into a document consumed by the Twitter speed – and where the large volume of news articles on the special council's findings overloaded the most competent multitaskers and the fastest speed readers POLITICO appeared back in the report and its 2000-plus footnotes to remove these details that have not gone Who Was Not Prosecuted The Special Council did some of his greatest headlines when he raised charges against Michael Flynn, Paul Manafort and Roger Stone. But Mueller's report also shows his sub-radar decisions on potential prosecutions that were never taken. Thereafter, Advocate General Jeff Sessions asked for a condemned prosecution against his Senate confirmation when he reminded the legislature that he had no communication with the Russian government during the 2016 campaign. The latter came out that he met the Russian ambassador in the United States on several occasions during the campaign. Mueller's team looked at the exchange in January 2017 and a couple of follow-up written responses before deciding that the polls held by the sessions were not "sufficient to prove", deliberately giving false answers to legislators. Most definitely, Mueller Sessions informed lawyers in March 2018 that he was in the eight months before Trump pushed Sessions out of his job. Donald Trump Jr., Jared Kushner and Paul Manafort all escaped prosecution for their role in June 2016 The Trump Tower meeting with a Russian lawyer promising dirt on Hillary Clinton. Mueller's report said the office investigated…

That’s what happens when two plus years of research work is distilled into a document consumed by the Twitter speed – and where the large volume of news articles on the special council’s findings overloaded the most competent multitaskers and the fastest speed readers

POLITICO appeared back in the report and its 2000-plus footnotes to remove these details that have not gone

Who Was Not Prosecuted

The Special Council did some of his greatest headlines when he raised charges against Michael Flynn, Paul Manafort and Roger Stone. But Mueller’s report also shows his sub-radar decisions on potential prosecutions that were never taken.

Thereafter, Advocate General Jeff Sessions asked for a condemned prosecution against his Senate confirmation when he reminded the legislature that he had no communication with the Russian government during the 2016 campaign. The latter came out that he met the Russian ambassador in the United States on several occasions during the campaign.

Mueller’s team looked at the exchange in January 2017 and a couple of follow-up written responses before deciding that the polls held by the sessions were not “sufficient to prove”, deliberately giving false answers to legislators. Most definitely, Mueller Sessions informed lawyers in March 2018 that he was in the eight months before Trump pushed Sessions out of his job.

Donald Trump Jr., Jared Kushner and Paul Manafort all escaped prosecution for their role in June 2016 The Trump Tower meeting with a Russian lawyer promising dirt on Hillary Clinton. Mueller’s report said the office investigated whether leading campaign leaders would charge fees to violate laws prohibiting foreign campaign contributions. But in the end they did not choose to press charges of concern, a belief was not a sure thing. The special council’s recognition lacked evidence to prove that any of the three men acted with general knowledge of the crime they were committing and said that the promised opposition research would not necessarily qualify as an illegal donation because it was unclear that the information was “a valuable thing. “

On the front of the hack, Mueller’s law also considered that they put Russians with trafficking in stolen property, a revealed burial in a footnote. Prosecutors considered taking the additional charges accusing the Russians on conspiracy and identity theft charges – during the National Depression Act for the Depression. In the end, however, the specialized council’s office found that chopped e-mails in electronic form would not be covered by the law’s almost century-old definition of “goods, goods or goods”.

Don Jr. dodges a voluntary Mueller interview

Donald Trump Jr. is quoted extensively in the Mueller report – from his Twitter flow to his text messages and interviews with the Senate Judiciary Committee and Sean Hannity.

But Mueller’s report does not contain any new Trump Jr. quotes.

It may be because the special advisor did not get the chance to talk directly to Trump Jr. The Mueller report explicitly states that the president’s eldest son turned down a request for a voluntary interview. What happened next is left to the imagination: Three rows of edited text in the same sentence are blacked out for great jury reasons.

Trump Jr.’s lawyer did not respond to a request for comment on whether his client met Mueller in a trial of the interview.

Annie Donaldson took devastating notes

Annie Donaldson, chief of former White House councils Don McGahn appears throughout Mueller’s report in some of his most critical moments, often as the White House assistant who took some of the most critical and concurrent notes.

Her memoir documents in vivid detail the chaos inside the west flange when Trump raged about Russia’s investigation.

“Just in the middle of another Russia’s fiasco,” McGahn told Donaldson, according to a note she took on March 2, 2017, which Trump pressed Sessions not to reuse from the probe.

Donaldson also memorialized a White House Council’s office meeting on the day she described “serious concern about obstruction” after referring sessions. And 10 days later, after the FBI director James Comey confirmed the existence from Trump-Russia’s probe, she wrote “POTUS in panic / chaos … Need binders put in front of POTUS. All things related to Russia.” She later said that this comment was based on discussions with other officials, not an eyewitness account.

On March 21, 2017, Donaldson similarly recalled that Trump himself said that Comey “had made a fool.” But May 9 was the most devastating of all.

“Is this the beginning of the end?” Donaldson wrote, as Mueller stated she said “because she was worried that the decision to terminate Comey and how it was exercised would be the end of the presidency.”

Mueller prevented missed and deleted messages

Special board members were not words to note that his work was partially stymied by missing messages and other messages.

Former Trump campaign manager Steve Bannon and his colleague Erik Prince gave, for example, contradictory accounts of their discussions on the prince’s post-selection trip to the Seychelles, where prince faced a high level associated with the Kremlin. Both claimed that they accidentally lost all records of their communication.

A related problem prevented Mueller’s efforts to investigate Manafort because “in some cases, messages were sent using encryption applications.” In addition, Rick Gates sent interned campaign search data to Manafort a longtime associated constantin Kilimnik, designed to share with Ukrainian oligarchs. But these messages were sent by the encrypted WhatsApp service, and “Gates then switched off communication daily.”

Sekulow needed a lawyer to deal with Mueller

Mueller’s report documented how even the president’s lawyer needed a lawyer – addressing false statements made by yet another president’s lawyer.

This happened.

Michael Cohen, the long-standing personal lawyer Trump, told Mueller’s prosecutor that he was assisted by other members of the president’s personal law when he prepared the congressional testimony and played out Trump’s interest in and awareness of efforts to build a trumpet tower in Moscow during the 2016 campaign.

Finally, Cohen was responsible for making a false statement to Congress in September 2017, and during his part-sessions, he appointed Trump’s personal counsel Jay Sekulow as helping to edit and review -sissue testimony.

In the Mueller report, the Special Adviser explained that Sekulow had a chance to add more details and context to Coh’s description of how the whole event happened. But Sekulow, through his own lawyer, declined.

There was a second “scope memo”

Republicans who tried to understand the depth of Mueller’s probe had long since fixed on posting a copy of the “scope memo” – an August 2017 document from Deputy Advocate-General Rod Rosenstein who explained the outlines of the special council’s investigation.

Mueller’s team revealed a private version of a memo to federal judges who presided over Manafort’s criminal trial in Alexandria, Va., Last summer, frustrating GOP lawmakers forced into their own bid to see it.

However, it was not the only scope message. The Mueller report revealed that Rosenstein delivered an even more detailed version of the note in October 2017 that paved the way for investigations to Stone, Cohen, former Trump campaign publisher Rick Gates and two other individuals whose names were edited for “personal privacy”. [19659004] In addition, the note approved Mueller to specifically seek Cohen’s use of an LLC to “receive money from Russian supported entities” and separately approved investigations to persons and entities considered league in the league with their original goals, including Manafort. Finally, the second scope message sent to Mueller the FBI’s ongoing false session investigation.

The Conversation Mueller-FBI Motivational – Revealed

One of Mueller’s most important mysteries is what would become of the significant intelligence findings he revealed – the details that do not lead to criminal prosecution but inform the government of national security threats and if any Americans became inept Kremlin tools.

That question is rested at the beginning of Mueller’s report, describing a law of the FBI set up to review their findings and sent written “summaries of foreign intelligence and counter intelligence to the FBIHQ and FBI Field Offices.”

The special counseling also offered at least one footnote a glimpse of what kind of information the results – which have not been released – may contain.

“The agency is aware of the reports th of other Russian entities” – not just the Kremlin’s social media “troll” – “engaged in similar active actions aimed at the United States. Some evidence collected by the Agency confirms these reports, and The agency has shared the evidence with other offices in the Justice and Trade Ministry. “

It is a brief insight into the agency’s work, but it could open up major new chapters in Russia’s intrigue for the congress, where Democrats have demanded information on the classified motifs from Mueller’s law and the FBI.

Mystique continues over what Carter Page did in Moscow

Carter Page – an American energy consultant whose Russian band has raised the FBI’s suspicions since at least 2013 – e-mailed the Trump campaign in January 2016 that he could arrange a “direct meeting in Moscow” between Trump and Russian President Vladimir Putin. He criticized US sanctions against Russia and preached high-level Kremlin contacts.

Less than two months later, the campaign lost him as a foreign policy advisor.

What was due to the fact that the page’s first challenge to the campaign has not been fully explained. And after 22 months, Mueller’s team was able to admit that it still can’t “fully” answer which side was made in Moscow in July 2016, a few months after joining the Trump campaign. The Special Council’s office said that it was difficult to obtain further evidence or testimony about the page’s journey. But the investigators also said that they could not prove beyond a reasonable doubt that Page had acted as a foreign agent.

Mueller’s report confirms that some things on the side do not add. For example, he apparently traveled to Moscow in July 2016 to provide the start address at Moscow’s new economic school, although the incident typically featured high-profile speakers such as Barack Obama. Putin’s chief spokesman Dmitry Peskov was notified of Sida’s visit, but decided not to meet him privately.

Sida originally denied having any significant meetings during her visit. But he admitted that Mueller met Andrey Baranov, a former Gazprom employee who had been the head of investor relations in Russia’s largest energy company, Rosneft. Sida told Mueller “the possibility of selling a share in Rosneft” may have been mentioned “in passing.”

Cohen suspects Putin who works for Olympic weightlifters

Shortly after, Cohen wrote a letter of intent to run Moscow’s real Ivanka Trump received an email from a woman named Lana Erchova and offered her husband Dmitry Klokov’s services as someone who could be helpful for his dad.

Ivanka Trump forwarded the email to Cohen, who mistakenly believed that Klokov was a former Russian Olympic weightlifter of the same name.

In fact, Klokov was the head of a large Russian electricity transmission company that had previously been employed as an aid to Russia’s energy minister. Emails that are exchanged between Cohen and Klokov indicate that they were trying to create a meeting between Trump and Putin – as Klokov called us interesting – already in December 2015.

Mueller could not state that Cohen told campaign about his conversations with Klokov or that someone joined him at a later time. Cohen told Mueller he let it go because he was already working on the Trump Tower Moscow project with Felix Sater, a Russian-born developer who claimed to have his own Kremlin connections.

But on July 27, 2018 something else happened strange. Lana Erchova, Klokov’s then wife, sent an “unwanted e-mail” to Mueller’s office, claiming that Klokov had asked her to reach Ivanka Trump “on behalf of the Russian officials” who, among other things, wanted to offer Trump “countries in the Crimea and [an] unofficial meeting with Putin. “Mueller’s office went out to request more details, but never received an answer.

A little more was learned about the mysterious overseas professor

One of the most tantalizing – and still unresolved – Surveys of Russia’s investigation is the role that a shady foreign professor played in the Kremlin’s election disorder.

Joseph Mifsud, described by Mueller as “a Maltese citizen who worked as a professor at the London Academy of Diplomacy in London” was the first to tell the Trump campaign that Russia had “dirt” on Clinton in the form of thousands of e- mails. His revelation came in April 2016, long before the hack of the Democratic National Committee was published.

George Papadopoulos, the Trump campaign advisor who met Mifsud and learned “dirt,” described Mifsud as “a good friend” in email to the campaign about their meetings. However, since he was arrested and subsequently imprisoned for lying to the FBI about his communications with Mifsud, Papadopoulos has insisted that the professor be a Western intelligence asset that set him up.

But Mueller outlines in the report, for the first time, “the various Russian contacts” Mifsud retained during his stay in London – which included a “one-time worker” from the Internet Research Agency, the company that hired Russia’s online troll that Mueller accused in connection with The Kremlin’s information campaign.

Parts of this section are edited, but Mueller indicates another Mifsud connection to “a Russian Defense Ministry employee” who had “overlapping contacts with a group of Russian military-led Facebook accounts” used to promote the Russians’ release of hacked democratic e-mail messages.

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