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We will eat re-edited food in five years

April 23, 2019 Science 0 Views CRISPR & Crops Jennifer Doudna, one of the co-inventors of CRISPR, thinks she knows which application for the powerful gene editing tool will be the first to affect the common – and it has nothing to do with hardening diseases or creating designer children. "I think the most profound things we see about the effects of CRISPR on people's everyday lives will be in the agricultural sector," Doudna told Business Insider – and these CRISPR crops have the potential to help alleviate problems ranging from hunger to obesity. Not GMO Let's understand this: Redesigned crops are very different from controversial genetically modified organisms (GMOs). While genetic modification involves mixing and matching genes from different organisms &#821 1; splitting DNA from a pesticide resistant bacterium into soybeans, gene editing involves making cha The difference between the two is so profound that the US Department of Agriculture announced in March 2018 that would not expose gene-edited crops to any additional regulation – a long way Better Bites We have already seen several examples of researchers using CRISPR to give vegetables beneficial properties – they have edited tomato plants to ensure higher yields, fungi to prevent brunning and soybeans to prevent the production of trans fats. The three examples alone illustrate CRISPR's potential to give us more food that lasts longer and is healthier than we currently have – and if Doudna is right we could see the super-charged foods and others get very much on our…

CRISPR & Crops

Jennifer Doudna, one of the co-inventors of CRISPR, thinks she knows which application for the powerful gene editing tool will be the first to affect the common – and it has nothing to do with hardening diseases or creating designer children.

“I think the most profound things we see about the effects of CRISPR on people’s everyday lives will be in the agricultural sector,” Doudna told Business Insider – and these CRISPR crops have the potential to help alleviate problems ranging from hunger to obesity.

Not GMO

Let’s understand this: Redesigned crops are very different from controversial genetically modified organisms (GMOs).

While genetic modification involves mixing and matching genes from different organisms &#821

1; splitting DNA from a pesticide resistant bacterium into soybeans, gene editing involves making cha

The difference between the two is so profound that the US Department of Agriculture announced in March 2018 that would not expose gene-edited crops to any additional regulation – a long way Better Bites

We have already seen several examples of researchers using CRISPR to give vegetables beneficial properties – they have edited tomato plants to ensure higher yields, fungi to prevent brunning and soybeans to prevent the production of trans fats.

The three examples alone illustrate CRISPR’s potential to give us more food that lasts longer and is healthier than we currently have – and if Doudna is right we could see the super-charged foods and others get very much on our plates soon.

READ MORE: We are going to eat the first Crispres foods within 5 years, accordin g to a geneticist who helped invent blockbuster gene editing tool [ Business Insider ]

More about edited food: The first edited food has reached American restaurants [19659014]
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