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Washington legislators consider “secure planning” for employees across the state

by Kellee Azar, KATU News Washington State Capitol &#821 1; KATU photo VANCOUVER, Wash. – Changes in how workers in Washington get their schedule and change shifts can come soon. Washington legislators are considering "secure planning" for employees across the state. Senate Bill 57-17 would require employers to send schedules two weeks in advance. The law would affect workers in a wide range of businesses, including retail, fast food and full service. A similar team is already in use in Seattle. Simone Barron working in Seattle says the problem is not early planning. Instead, it is the flexibility. "We don't want this. We never asked for this," she says. According to the law, employers would have to pay extra if they change shifts with another employee. "There are many ways that full service staff manipulates their schedules to create a working life balance and during safe planning or restrictive planning you cannot do things to create a balance between working life, Barron says. She said because of these penalties, employers are less likely to approve schedulers. Sage Wilson from Working Washington supports the bill and says employees deserve to be compensated. "An employee who is flexible and helps to do this because this company deserves a little extra," she said. Source link

by Kellee Azar, KATU News

Washington State Capitol &#821

1; KATU photo

VANCOUVER, Wash. – Changes in how workers in Washington get their schedule and change shifts can come soon.

Washington legislators are considering “secure planning” for employees across the state.

Senate Bill 57-17 would require employers to send schedules two weeks in advance.

The law would affect workers in a wide range of businesses, including retail, fast food and full service. A similar team is already in use in Seattle.

Simone Barron working in Seattle says the problem is not early planning. Instead, it is the flexibility.

“We don’t want this. We never asked for this,” she says.

According to the law, employers would have to pay extra if they change shifts with another employee.

“There are many ways that full service staff manipulates their schedules to create a working life balance and during safe planning or restrictive planning you cannot do things to create a balance between working life, Barron says.

She said because of these penalties, employers are less likely to approve schedulers.

Sage Wilson from Working Washington supports the bill and says employees deserve to be compensated.

“An employee who is flexible and helps to do this because this company deserves a little extra,” she said.


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