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Video shows how difficult it really is to go to earth after 6 months in space

Going to space is serious business. How serious? Well, let this video from NASA astronaut Drew Feustel tell you. Feustel spent 197 days – so over half a year – aboard the International Space Station. It is a fairly regular task length. And all that time is spent in microgravity. But we humans are not built for weightless floating around. When our bodies do not constantly stretch against the pull of gravity, all kinds of strange things happen. Among these, our muscles are drawn and we lose bone density at about 10 times the degree of osteoporosis. When the astronauts return to Earth after a duration in space, the return to gravity can give a rather severe scam as their sense of balance adjustment. So moving around is much harder than when they left. Feustel's video, published on Twitter last December, shows just how much. He stumbles trying to walk just a few steps in a straight line. Welcome home # SoyuzMS09 ! On October 5, I looked like walking on heel-toe eyes closed after 1 97 days at @Space_Station during the Field Test experiment … I hope the recently returned crew feels much better. Video credits @IndiraFeustel pic.twitter.com/KsFuJgoYXh – A.J. (Drew) Feustel (@Astro_Feustel) December 20, 2018 ISS is currently equipped with a number of machines to give astronauts a full-body training. On average, they spend two hours a day with them. This regime is designed to try to alleviate the atrophy somewhat, but even with the training program in…

Going to space is serious business. How serious? Well, let this video from NASA astronaut Drew Feustel tell you.

Feustel spent 197 days – so over half a year – aboard the International Space Station. It is a fairly regular task length. And all that time is spent in microgravity.

But we humans are not built for weightless floating around. When our bodies do not constantly stretch against the pull of gravity, all kinds of strange things happen. Among these, our muscles are drawn and we lose bone density at about 10 times the degree of osteoporosis.

When the astronauts return to Earth after a duration in space, the return to gravity can give a rather severe scam as their sense of balance adjustment.

So moving around is much harder than when they left. Feustel’s video, published on Twitter last December, shows just how much. He stumbles trying to walk just a few steps in a straight line.

ISS is currently equipped with a number of machines to give astronauts a full-body training. On average, they spend two hours a day with them.

This regime is designed to try to alleviate the atrophy somewhat, but even with the training program in place, it takes at least three to four years for an astronaut to recover completely after a six-month stint.

This is just one of the many challenges we need to find out for the inevitable journey to Mars. The longer the stay, the greater the loss of bone density and the trip to Mars is at least six months.

From March 2015 to March 2016, astronauts Scott Kelly from NASA and Mikhail Korniyenko of Roscosmos spent 342 days in space making observations on the health effects of a long space mission.

Kelly, as you might guess, was also pretty unsteady on his feet. The astronauts are certainly dedicated!

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