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USTR Lighthizer denies that he said China tariffs remain

US. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer claims to be witnessing before the Senate Certificate of Trade, Justice, Science and Associates, the…

US. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer claims to be witnessing before the Senate Certificate of Trade, Justice, Science and Associates, the Subcommittee’s Hearing on the proposed budget assessments and the motivation for FY2019 for the United States Trade Representative Office at Dirksen Senate Offices Building in Washington, USA, July 26, 201

8. REUTERS / Mary F. Calvert

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – US Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer on Thursday rejected a report he had told some industry leaders that another round of Chinese import tariffs had been put on hold as the two nations continue negotiations.

“Ambassador Lighthizer has not left any representations to industry leaders that future 301 tariffs remain,” said a spokesman for his office in a statement. “The plan for the tariffs … has not changed at all. Any reports of the opposite are incorrect.”

The report appeared in the Financial Times, which cited an above-mentioned person familiar with the situation.

US. President Donald Trump has already introduced $ 250 billion of Chinese imports into the United States to force Beijing concessions on its list of trade reform requirements. He has also threatened to target another $ 267 billion if his claims are not addressed.

Reuters reported Wednesday that China had submitted a written response to Washington’s claims, referring to three US government sources. However, the sources did not provide further details and it was not clear if the answer contained concessions that would satisfy Trump.

Back and forth on trade comes before an expected meeting between Trump and China’s President Xi Jinping on the side of a G20 summit in Argentina in late November and early December.

While two industry sources familiar with the content of the response told Reuters, it was largely a transformation of previous Chinese commitments, it was considered a necessary starting point for further negotiations.

One of the sources informed of China’s response said that repeated repatriations that Xi had done in recent talks demanded that the United States raise taxes, including those made on imports of steel and aluminum.

“They are not close to an advantageous trade in trade. Not in the same universe,” said Washington-based source.

Reporting by Tim Ahmann; Further Reporting by David Lawder and Eric Beech; Editing Richard Chang and Phil Berlowitz

Our Standards: Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.


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