Categories: world

USA and Japan to cooperate on returning to the moon

WASHINGTON – The United States and Japan governments have agreed on further cooperation in space that may include flying Japanese astronauts against the moon. At a joint press conference in Tokyo on May 27 with Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, President Donald Trump mentioned space exploration collaboration as a result of his meetings during President's visit to the country. "I'm happy to confirm that Prime Minister Abe and I have agreed to dramatically expand our nations cooperation in human space exploration" Trump said. "Japan will agree to our mission to send American astronauts to space. We come to the moon, we will soon be coming to Mars. It's very exciting." Related: Can NASA really set astronauts on the moon 2024? A NASA chart released in March before the NASA announcement would speed up its human moon landing by 2024 identifies potential contributions from international partners, including the Japanese space agency JAXA. [Image:©NASATV) Neither Trump nor Abe developed on the nature of that agreement, which was not released. A fact sheet released by the State Department on May 27 noted that the two "agreed on the importance of a sustainable human presence on and around the moon." "Because of their experience with the International Space Station (ISS), Japanese astronauts will strive to join American astronauts on the moon and destinations beyond," noted the state fact sheet. A cooperation agreement of some kind between the US and Japan was expected to be signed during Trump's visit. Japan, an important partner on the ISS,…

WASHINGTON – The United States and Japan governments have agreed on further cooperation in space that may include flying Japanese astronauts against the moon.

At a joint press conference in Tokyo on May 27 with Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, President Donald Trump mentioned space exploration collaboration as a result of his meetings during President’s visit to the country.

“I’m happy to confirm that Prime Minister Abe and I have agreed to dramatically expand our nations cooperation in human space exploration” Trump said. “Japan will agree to our mission to send American astronauts to space. We come to the moon, we will soon be coming to Mars. It’s very exciting.”

Related: Can NASA really set astronauts on the moon 2024?

A NASA chart released in March before the NASA announcement would speed up its human moon landing by 2024 identifies potential contributions from international partners, including the Japanese space agency JAXA. [Image:©NASATV)

Neither Trump nor Abe developed on the nature of that agreement, which was not released. A fact sheet released by the State Department on May 27 noted that the two “agreed on the importance of a sustainable human presence on and around the moon.”

“Because of their experience with the International Space Station (ISS), Japanese astronauts will strive to join American astronauts on the moon and destinations beyond,” noted the state fact sheet.

A cooperation agreement of some kind between the US and Japan was expected to be signed during Trump’s visit. Japan, an important partner on the ISS, had shown interest in participating in aspects of NASA’s renewed pressures to return to the moon, including contributing modules to the Gateway facility. NASA plans to evolve in the moon’s orbit to support human moon landings.

“It is a great pleasure to cooperate with NASA in that endeavor,” said Hiroshi Yamakawa, president of the Japanese space agency JAXA, in a video released on May 28 by NASA on international collaboration on the Gateway development and its overall plans for The Moon, 1

9659002] In on May 28, NASA administrator Jim Bridenstine said he was “very excited” about the deal Trump and Abe announced. “Japan and [JAXA] are important partners in our work to move on to the moon and on to Mars! ”

With NASA accelerating their plans to return people to the moon surface in 2024, compared to the 2028 date in their previous plans, the main roles of international partners will most often be postponed to the second phase, which will to focus on creating a sustainable human presence on and around the moon after the 2024 landing, which would include grants as Gateway modules, which could contribute a great deal r slots on later countries’ assignments in much the same way as ISS partners get crew tracks on space station missions.

“Accelerating the landing date by 2024 makes it harder for us to incorporate our international partners early,” admitted Ken Bowersox, assistant associate administrator for human exploration and operations at NASA, during a May 28 meeting of a NASA Advisory Committee. “We are still looking to work with our international partners. However, many of their elements will come after 2024 anyway.”

But he added that if international partners can speed up their contributions, “they are welcome to participate in the early phases.”

It is unclear whether this agreement has any impact on other aspects of space operations between the United States and Japan. government or commercial, but companies welcome the agreement in any case. One example is the Japanese company ispace, which develops commercial lunar landers and is part of a team led by the American company Draper who won one of nine commercial Lunar Payload Services agreements from NASA in November to transport research loads to the moon surface.

“We are pleased to learn that the US and Japan will deepen their strong relationship in space exploration through a focused effort on moon exploration,” said Takeshi Hakamada, founder and head of ispace, in a statement to SpaceNews. “In addition to our American partner, Draper, ispace is well prepared and eager to support this new quest between the United States and Japan.” his story was provided by SpaceNews intended to cover all aspects of the space industry.


Source link

Share
Published by
Faela