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US Review: Jordan Peele's Twilight Zone Audition is brilliant

How do you follow a pop culture juggernaut like Get Out? After not only crushing the box office but earning a script Oscar, Jordan Peele is ready to haunt our collective nightmares again with us – proving he's the perfect guy to restart the Twilight Zone. As the best Twilight Zone episodes, We have both twists and social comments. Jordan Peele has previously said he would not make another movie about race, so for his sophomore function, he extends his reach and addresses the entire US in a movie that asks us to look in and see the danger we ourselves have become. To this end, we begin with a prologue established in 1 986, where a young Adelaide Wilson (Madison Curry) looks at a commercial for Hands Across America – a campaign to make a human chain across the continent before stumbling across a hall of mirrors under a Santa Cruz pier. She finds more than just reflections, an event that leaves her traumatized. About 30 years later, the burden of that moment still supports an adult Adelaide (Lupita Nyong & # 39; o), who returns to Santa Cruz with her husband Gabe (Winston Duke) and their children Zora (Shahadi Wright Joseph) and Jason ( Evan Alex) for the summer. Jordan Peele shows that he is capable of writing compelling and fully formed characters, because he immediately makes you fall in love with this family. Sure, they're not perfect. Gabe is awkward and has an infinite variety of dad…

How do you follow a pop culture juggernaut like Get Out? After not only crushing the box office but earning a script Oscar, Jordan Peele is ready to haunt our collective nightmares again with us – proving he’s the perfect guy to restart the Twilight Zone.

As the best Twilight Zone episodes, We have both twists and social comments. Jordan Peele has previously said he would not make another movie about race, so for his sophomore function, he extends his reach and addresses the entire US in a movie that asks us to look in and see the danger we ourselves have become. To this end, we begin with a prologue established in 1

986, where a young Adelaide Wilson (Madison Curry) looks at a commercial for Hands Across America – a campaign to make a human chain across the continent before stumbling across a hall of mirrors under a Santa Cruz pier. She finds more than just reflections, an event that leaves her traumatized.

About 30 years later, the burden of that moment still supports an adult Adelaide (Lupita Nyong & # 39; o), who returns to Santa Cruz with her husband Gabe (Winston Duke) and their children Zora (Shahadi Wright Joseph) and Jason ( Evan Alex) for the summer. Jordan Peele shows that he is capable of writing compelling and fully formed characters, because he immediately makes you fall in love with this family. Sure, they’re not perfect. Gabe is awkward and has an infinite variety of dad jokes (“You don’t need the internet. You have the uncanny!”) And the kids are struggling all the time, but you feel the love between them. Adelaine has a bad feeling for this trip, and a series of unpleasant events doesn’t help relieve her concern.

After a trip to the beach with his friends Kitty (Elisabeth Moss) and Josh (Tim Heidecker), Wilson’s back home comes to find four shady characters standing in their driveway. It is the Doppler gangster who was discovered in the trailers, has scary blood-red jumpsuit and gloves and sports very sharp scissors. The sight of Lupita staring in horror at herself is the latest occurrence of what would be known as “Peele Stare, which immediately iconic as Daniel Kaluyy’s hypnotized, glazed expression in Get Out.”

If Get Out was a victim of “is it really horror?” Question, Jordan Peele made sure we didn’t fall for the same trick. This is a horror movie through and through, full of references to everything from Friday the 13th and the live death to newer fare like the Black Swan. Just as hereditary last year, the best scares will only be able to see something in the dark corner of the screen. Home invasion sequences will make you cover your eyes, but the craft at hand will prevent you from looking away. But, Peele is not shy of making you laugh, with a perfectly balanced mix of horror with humor that doesn’t feel undisturbed. Winston Duke in particular gives a necessary levitation to the film, with its little humorous feeling that is comparable and sympathetic to stopping you thinking of him as just the guy from Black Panther. Peele not only distinguishes the mix of horror and humor, but rather writes smart characters. As in Get Out, Wilson’s quickly reacted to the shady numbers in his driveway and immediately called the police and started planning his stand-off.

Visually, Us is already a candidate for the most beautiful horror movie 2019, mostly thanks to cinematographer Mike Gioulakis man in charge of the amazing it follows. The Gioulakis camera swirls, boasts and chases the characters almost as much as their doppelganger counterparts, and his use of light and shadow is as effective as anyone jumping scare. Also, the score, by Getout composer Michael Abels, will track your nightmares for days to come, while taking with you Jerry Goldsmith’s score for The Omen, except without the demonic child.

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Faela