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UK's PM may invite delegated nations to regain their Brexit deal

LONDON (Reuters) – UK Prime Minister Theresa May urges the wounded nations of Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland to "listen to business" at a meeting on Wednesday and resume her Brexit deal, which still predicts close relations with the EU. PHILPHOTO: Britain's Prime Minister Theresa May leaves 10 Downing Steet in London, UK on December 17, 2018. REUTERS / Toby Melville One day after her government said it would implement plans for a comprehensive Brexit in its entirety, May was due to how her agreement works for all parts of Britain, said her office. "I'm convinced that what we have agreed for the whole of Britain," she relied on to say before the meeting. "It is therefore more important than ever that the decentralized administrations come behind the deal and listen to companies and industry agencies across all four nations that have shown that it provides the security they need." May is due to meet Scotland's Prime Minister Nicola Sturgeon, New Prime Minister of Wales Mark Drakeford and Representative of Northern Ireland's Civil Service at her office in Downing Street. She will update plans made for any eventuality including leaving the EU without any kind of agreement, plans that include placing space on ferries to ensure a regular flow of medical equipment and keeping 3500 armed forces in standby to support contingency plans. With only 100 days until Britain leaves the EU, May has not yet received support from a deeply divided parliament for the agreement she struck last month…

LONDON (Reuters) – UK Prime Minister Theresa May urges the wounded nations of Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland to “listen to business” at a meeting on Wednesday and resume her Brexit deal, which still predicts close relations with the EU.

PHILPHOTO: Britain’s Prime Minister Theresa May leaves 10 Downing Steet in London, UK on December 17, 2018. REUTERS / Toby Melville

One day after her government said it would implement plans for a comprehensive Brexit in its entirety, May was due to how her agreement works for all parts of Britain, said her office.

“I’m convinced that what we have agreed for the whole of Britain,” she relied on to say before the meeting.

“It is therefore more important than ever that the decentralized administrations come behind the deal and listen to companies and industry agencies across all four nations that have shown that it provides the security they need.”

May is due to meet Scotland’s Prime Minister Nicola Sturgeon, New Prime Minister of Wales Mark Drakeford and Representative of Northern Ireland’s Civil Service at her office in Downing Street.

She will update plans made for any eventuality including leaving the EU without any kind of agreement, plans that include placing space on ferries to ensure a regular flow of medical equipment and keeping 3500 armed forces in standby to support contingency plans.

With only 100 days until Britain leaves the EU, May has not yet received support from a deeply divided parliament for the agreement she struck last month with Brussels.

She has said a delayed vote that her agreement will take place in mid-January, which led to some legislators accusing her of trying to force Parliament to support her by driving around the clock when the March 29 closing day approaches .

Sturgeon, leader of the independent minded Scottish National Party (SNP), has accused May of not listening to Scottish opinion and has liked her Brexit store to take a blindfolded jump from a cliff.

The Welsh Assembly also rejected the agreement in a symbolic poll earlier this month. Northern Ireland has been non-executive director since January 2017 when the government parties, Sinn Fein and Mays allied at Westminster, DUP, shared a hard line.

A so-called backstop plan to avoid the reintroduction of a hard border between Ireland and Northern Ireland is one of the main obstacles to the parliamentary agreement on maize agreement.

“From the Scottish Fishermen Federation and Diageo to Airbus and Manufacturing Northern Ireland, business across the UK wants to offer us this agreement as it provides them with the clarity and stability they need to protect work and living standards,” May is due to say .

Reporting by Stephen Addison; Editing James Davey

Our Standards: Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.

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