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Trump doesn't want a “better” deal with Iran.

U.S. President Donald Trump and Iranian President Hassan Rouhani. Image illustration of Slate. Photos of Sabah Arar / AFP / Getty Images and Mandel Ngan / AFP / Getty Images. One reason so many Democrats are running for president: They don't believe Joe Biden can win The Supreme Court is prepared to delete its credibility to let the drum direct the census The census case will define Roberts Court Mueller Proved Comey told the truth President Donald Trump is pushing Iran like never before. It is difficult to see where this can lead except chaos or war. And it's pretty clear that Trump wants it that way. When Trump withdrew Iraq's nuclear agreement and resumed economic sanctions that had been abolished as part of this agreement, he issued six months of exemption to eight countries, China, India, Iraq, Turkey, South Korea, Italy, Greece, and Taiwan – so that they can continue to buy Iranian oil. On Monday, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo announced that the deviations would end on May 2. Thereafter, any country doing business with the Islamic Republic would be blocked from the US banking system, which dominates financial transactions worldwide. In recent months, some countries, especially China and members of the European Union, have discussed setting up a mechanism for trade with Iran without going through US banks, but it has been easier said than done. The European countries that were granted exemption have already stopped importing Iranian oils. the others have cut back, albeit reluctantly. After…

 U.S. President Donald Trump and Iranian President Hassan Rouhani.

U.S. President Donald Trump and Iranian President Hassan Rouhani.

Image illustration of Slate. Photos of Sabah Arar / AFP / Getty Images and Mandel Ngan / AFP / Getty Images.

President Donald Trump is pushing Iran like never before. It is difficult to see where this can lead except chaos or war. And it’s pretty clear that Trump wants it that way.

When Trump withdrew Iraq’s nuclear agreement and resumed economic sanctions that had been abolished as part of this agreement, he issued six months of exemption to eight countries, China, India, Iraq, Turkey, South Korea, Italy, Greece, and Taiwan – so that they can continue to buy Iranian oil. On Monday, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo announced that the deviations would end on May 2. Thereafter, any country doing business with the Islamic Republic would be blocked from the US banking system, which dominates financial transactions worldwide.

In recent months, some countries, especially China and members of the European Union, have discussed setting up a mechanism for trade with Iran without going through US banks, but it has been easier said than done. The European countries that were granted exemption have already stopped importing Iranian oils. the others have cut back, albeit reluctantly. After May 2, if Washington really enforces a no-tolerance ban, Iran – already hurting economically – will be inboxed.

Iranian President Hassan Rouhani and his Foreign Minister, Mohammad Javad Zarif, have said that in response to this hostile act, they could block the Strait of Hormus, a water source with a two-mile tram that passes 20 percent of the world’s oil supply. The idea is that if Iran cannot send its oil through the strait, which borders its territory, no one else can. Zarif has also said that Iran can resume enriching uranium and thus revive its core program – in response. Either of these moves would probably spark an American military reaction, which might be what Trump wants to happen.

A clear sign that Trump wants Iran inboxat is that he has not offered another choice – he has not said what he wants the Iranian government to do in exchange for releasing his campaign ” maximum pressure. “

Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif resembled the Trump Administration’s behavior with a “gangster”.

Pompeo has said he wants a “better” nuclear contract but his definition of the word is so top that he clearly signals that he doesn’t mean it. In a speech at the Heritage Foundation in May, he presented 12 conditions that Iran must meet for a new deal. They include ending its uranium enrichment – a ban not imposed on any other country in the world. (Article IV of the Non-Proliferation Treaty gives the signatories the “unforgivable” right to develop nuclear energy for peaceful purposes, which includes enriching uranium at low levels. The Iran agreement allows enrichment up to 3% below what is needed to make a weapon .) Pompeo also demanded that Iran give international inspectors “unqualified access” to “all places throughout Iran” – a formula for espionage that no country would accept. He said that Iran must stop testing and developing ballistic and cruise missiles (a ban on development is impossible to verify). final aid to Syria, Hezbollah and Houthis in Yemen; disarm their militias in Iraq release all threats to Israel and release all foreign prisoners. All these steps would be welcome, but no nation would abandon so much of its sovereignty to a foreign power, except possibly after a total defeat in a war.

More drastically still, Pompeo noted these conditions not as the conditions for a new deal, but only as the steps that Iran must take before the US sits down on the negotiating table. What additional concessions, maybe they ask, would Trump and Pompeo ask for? In any case, the Iranians have no reason to trust them, since Trump withdrew from the existing deal, which was negotiated with six other countries, although the International Atomic Energy Agency has confirmed many times that Iran is in full agreement.

There are ways to get better contact with Iran, if that is what Trump really wanted. He could do what Presidents Ford, Carter, Reagan, the two Bushes, Clinton and Obama did to get better nuclear dealings with the Kremlin. They negotiated a series of treaties each of which reduced nuclear weapons to lower levels without tearing up any previous agreement simply because it did not go as far as one side or the other would have preferred.

At a Q&A with journalists on Iran’s UN mission in New York on Thursday, Javad Zarif resembled Trump’s administration behavior to a “gangster”. Iran’s nuclear agreement, which is incorporated into a UN Security Council resolution, prevents obstacles to trade with Iran. Trump’s officials don’t seem like “the world’s police,” he said. Rather, they require other nations to “break the law”.

Sad to say, he’s right, and that’s why so many countries, especially those who signed the nuclear agreement, are bitter about how Trump offers US power.

But Javad Zarif took care of distinguishing between Trump and his administration, and notes National Security Adviser John Bolton is a long-standing advocate of government change in Iran, while Trump has promised to avoid another stupid and expensive war in the Middle East. He also noted that Iran “never left the negotiating table”; Only the United States did, and Tehran is ready to continue talks.

But this step in an appeal to Trump’s more embedded impulses is probably based on a false hope. Apparently, Trump has no interest in talking to the Iranians about a new deal. And Pompeo, who sees much of his job as saying what Trump wants him to say, reflects that contempt. In his inheritance and in others, especially one delivered in July for a spectator of Iranian Americans at Reagan’s presidential library, Pompeo emphasized American solidarity with “the Iranian people” against their oppressive government. He went about as far as a leading American diplomat could go towards developing a “regime shift” policy without expressing those words.

Trump may well believe that this “maximum pressure” will simply lead the Iranian regime to its knees. This is doubtful. But if it does, it is even more unlikely that Western inclined freedom fighters will replace top-level mullahs. Tehran is the most literary, pro-Western city in the entire Middle East, outside of Israel, but even its citizens know the history of foreign states in Iran and, despite their hatred of the Middle Ages who occupy the highest power in their country, would resist another episode of American interference . If the mullahs were to be eradicated in any way, they would more likely succeed with a more anti-Western faction, which is probably the most intolerable part of the military.

Trump’s intensified press campaign may be justified if Iran posed an urgent threat to the United States, its allies or its interests – or whether Iran’s leaders were ready to break out of nuclear power restrictions. But it does not, and they are not. The other parties to the nuclear agreement, the UK, France, Germany, Russia and China, adhere to it, see no reason to go out and many reasons to stay. It prevents Iran from building a nuclear weapon, has already led to the dismantling of materials with which they can have built a bomb and contains the densest verification system in the history of the WMD. Also, most Israeli military and intelligence officials prefer to stick to the deal. Trump only serves the interests of Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and his right-calibrated partner, who wants to hold Iran up and out of the region’s Sunni Arab powers, especially Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates, who want to fight on Iran. In fact, Trump’s new policy, forcing the world to revive the sanctions he wants, is a declaration of economic war.

Although Iran does not close the Hormuz route or resume enriching uranium, the move is likely to address the global economy, at least. Saudi Arabia and the UAE have said they will redirect some of their oil exports to Iraq and Turkey to compensate for the abolition of Iranian supplies. But it is unclear where this extra oil comes from – they have recently lowered their production and have not said that they will pump any more – or who will compensate the countries that once received lots of oil from the Arabs but now become short. Oil analysts say Trump’s policy will push global deliveries into a market that is already facing disturbances and will almost certainly raise petrol prices, just in time to make the summer vacation more expensive.

Trump takes a big risk, alienates allies, exacerbates US consumers, disturbs global markets and possibly triggers war – as he doesn’t like Iran and doesn’t like Iran’s nuclear deal (or any other deal) fought by President Barack Obama. He rules pique, and we can all pay the price in one way or another.

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