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Thousands pay respect for Mason fourth degrees who died after the flu, strep throat diagnosis

She was a young girl with a lot of promises and layers of personality. The community of Mason and friends and family around the country is now amusing the loss of Sable Gibson. Gibson, 10, died Wednesday. She was in fourth grade at the Western Row Elementary School and was the youngest of six children, nicknamed "Little Sister", "Little Sis" and "Sister Sue." Thousands celebrated their lives on Saturday during a four-hour visit followed by the young girl's funeral service, which lasted about an hour and a half. The Church's leaders estimate that approximately 2,000 people paid their respect during visiting time. Her family says doctors sent their home Tuesday with medicine to treat the flu and strep throat. Hours later, she suffered from cardiac arrest, became defenseless and flew by helicopter to the children's hospital. Her uncle described them about 24 hours her family spent on her side leading up to her death. "The grief is paralyzed. The steam is numbing. Within a few hours, this little child will not move." Lonnie Landess said. "Awesome tragic." Gibson's classmates made heart-warming videos that were shown during her funeral. "I love your laughter and how, always when I saw you, you smile," a friend said. "She was my best friend, and I will always love her," said another. During the funeral service, held at the Crossing Community Church in Mason, family members describe Gibson as creative, kind, caring, fun, and loving. Like most 1 0-year-olds, she loved sleep and King's Island.…

She was a young girl with a lot of promises and layers of personality. The community of Mason and friends and family around the country is now amusing the loss of Sable Gibson. Gibson, 10, died Wednesday. She was in fourth grade at the Western Row Elementary School and was the youngest of six children, nicknamed “Little Sister”, “Little Sis” and “Sister Sue.” Thousands celebrated their lives on Saturday during a four-hour visit followed by the young girl’s funeral service, which lasted about an hour and a half. The Church’s leaders estimate that approximately 2,000 people paid their respect during visiting time. Her family says doctors sent their home Tuesday with medicine to treat the flu and strep throat. Hours later, she suffered from cardiac arrest, became defenseless and flew by helicopter to the children’s hospital. Her uncle described them about 24 hours her family spent on her side leading up to her death. “The grief is paralyzed. The steam is numbing. Within a few hours, this little child will not move.” Lonnie Landess said. “Awesome tragic.” Gibson’s classmates made heart-warming videos that were shown during her funeral. “I love your laughter and how, always when I saw you, you smile,” a friend said. “She was my best friend, and I will always love her,” said another. During the funeral service, held at the Crossing Community Church in Mason, family members describe Gibson as creative, kind, caring, fun, and loving. Like most 1

0-year-olds, she loved sleep and King’s Island. She also loved the color pink, art and craft, played Uno and hugged her family members. In her last hours, her family created two works of art with her. Gibson, her five siblings and parents pressed one of their hands in color and pressed them onto a canvas. Then each family member made a clay impression with his little sister’s hand. Her uncle explained how each family member will receive these memories forever. Another speaker at the funeral Carl Kuhl described the young girl’s personality through several stories. “Many of you don’t know that every day Sable took two lunches at school, because there was another child who didn’t have lunch and she fed him,” Kuhl said. . She would say, “Mom, he doesn’t like the red Doritos. Get the Blue Doritos.” “Her father said she had a sixth sense of caring about people. thoughtful in return.

She was a young girl with a lot of promises and layers of personality. The community of Mason and friends and family around the country is now amusing the loss of Sable Gibson.

Gibson, 10, died Wednesday. She was in fourth grade at the Western Row Elementary School and was the youngest of six children, nicknamed “Little Sister”, “Little Sis” and “Sister Sue.”

Thousands celebrated their lives Saturday during a four-hour visit followed by the young girl’s funeral service, which lasted about one and a half hours. Church leaders estimate that about 2,000 people paid their respect during the visit.

Her family says doctors sent their home Tuesday with medicine to treat the flu and strep throat. She later suffered cardiac arrest, became unresponsive and flew the helicopter to the children’s hospital.

Her uncle described them about 24 hours her family spent by her side leading up to her death.

“The grief is paralysis is numbering. Within a few hours, this little child will not move.” Lonnie Landess said. “Awesome tragic.”

Gibson’s classmates made heart-warming videos that were shown during her funeral.

“I love your laughter and how, always when I saw you, you smile,” said a friend.

“She was my best friend, and I will always love her,” said another.

] During the funeral service, held at the River Crossing Community Church in Mason, family members described Gibson as creative, kind, caring, fun, and loving.

Like most 10-year-olds, she loved sleep and King’s Island. She also loved the color pink, art and craft, played Uno and hugged her family members.

In her last hours, her family created two works of art with her. Gibson, her five siblings and parents pressed one of their hands in color and pressed them onto a canvas. Then each family member made a clay impression with his little sister’s hand.

Her uncle explained how each family member will have these memories forever.

Another speaker at the funeral, Carl Kuhl, described the young girl’s personality through several stories.

“Many of you do not know that every day Sable took two lunches in school, because there was another child not I have lunch and she fed him, Kuhl said.” Sometimes she would take two bags of chips because one another friend did not have chips. She would say, “Mom, he doesn’t like the red Doritos. Get the blue Doritos.” “

Her father said she had a sixth sense of caring for people.

It was obvious that Sable Gibson, who proved through the exclusion of social support, was loved and cared for.

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