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This woman became a “living cadaver” in the name of Progressive Science

S usan Potter always knew she would be sliced ​​in 27,000 pieces. In her last will and will, Potter donated her body to the Visible Human Body project, a program that transforms human cadres into virtual specimens. The amazing video above shows exactly what Potter would leave behind: Something that would "affect all humanity." It was a choice that Potter was made 16 years ago, as documented by National Geographic ] for the past 14 years. After she died of pneumonia at 87, 2015, her little body – measured five feet a inch &#821 1; was frozen. It was later seen in four blocks, sliced ​​in millimeters-thin pieces and photographed after each disc. These images are collected in a digitized collection for anatomy students to use as an important part of their studies. Potter contacted Vic Spitzer, Ph.D., to become his experiment after reading about the Visible Human Project in the newspaper. But Spitzer, head of the Center for Human Simulation at the University of Colorado's School of Medicine, had met Potter earlier. She was famous for selling flowers on campus during the holidays. Now, near where her body was kept in the middle of the freezer, decorating flowers on the walls. Donor Susan Potter. It was a condition that Potter, an immigrant from Germany, set before her death to tour where her body was to be held before she officially decided to donate her remains. Spitzer did not want to, but finally followed and explained that he said "I…

S usan Potter always knew she would be sliced ​​in 27,000 pieces. In her last will and will, Potter donated her body to the Visible Human Body project, a program that transforms human cadres into virtual specimens. The amazing video above shows exactly what Potter would leave behind: Something that would “affect all humanity.”

It was a choice that Potter was made 16 years ago, as documented by National Geographic ] for the past 14 years. After she died of pneumonia at 87, 2015, her little body – measured five feet a inch &#821

1; was frozen. It was later seen in four blocks, sliced ​​in millimeters-thin pieces and photographed after each disc. These images are collected in a digitized collection for anatomy students to use as an important part of their studies.

Potter contacted Vic Spitzer, Ph.D., to become his experiment after reading about the Visible Human Project in the newspaper. But Spitzer, head of the Center for Human Simulation at the University of Colorado’s School of Medicine, had met Potter earlier. She was famous for selling flowers on campus during the holidays. Now, near where her body was kept in the middle of the freezer, decorating flowers on the walls.

 Susan Potter Donor Susan Potter.

It was a condition that Potter, an immigrant from Germany, set before her death to tour where her body was to be held before she officially decided to donate her remains. Spitzer did not want to, but finally followed and explained that he said “I do not want to show you where you end up!”

Spitzer did not count on making friends with the woman, which he would eventually put into a machine and a disc.

“We became friends to my … I did not want to be her friend,” he explained. “I was not very happy with the imaging and cutting of my friend.”

 Susan Potter The potter body lasted 63 microns at a time, so there is so high detail.

But, in Spitzer’s words, Potter would “quit the student’s minds”. Since her body had gone through a double mastectomy, melanoma, vertebral surgery, a hip replacement and diabetes, her body gave a different perspective compared to some others in the visible human collection – it was ill. Now, when the students will understand her body piece, they can gain a deeper understanding of a person similar to many of her future patients.

It typically takes about seven years to complete the process of creating a “virtual cadaver,” and students and researchers will work with Potter’s body for years to come. The photographs taken by her body will almost be stacked and then into a 3D image. Students can in turn remove the skin, fat and muscles of 3D with one click – making it an important tool for learning anatomy side by side with a real cadaver.

Before Potter passed, she also made videos of why she wanted to donate her body that future students can consume for several years to come. During her adult life, her body went through trials of infinity and ill health, and after her death, she hoped to help sick individuals as well as the doctors who would treat her one day.

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