Categories: world

This is an actual picture of the shockwaves of supersonic jets that interact with each other

After more than 10 years of hard work, NASA has reached a milestone. We are used to NASA reaching milestones, but this one is a little different. This is about a type of photography that takes pictures of the flow of liquids. It's called Schlieren Photography, and the schlieren is German for "dash". It was first developed in 1864 by a German physicist named August Toepler to study supersonic movement. Now NASA uses it to see what happens when jet aircraft break the sound barrier, to eliminate the sonic boom that accompanies it. And the pictures they get are pretty cool. "We never dreamed it would be so clear, this beautiful." &#821 1; Physical Scientist J.T. Heineck by NASA's Ames Research. However, there is more than eye-candy. It is part of the effort to create quieter supersonic aircraft. Right now there are strict rules on flying supersonic aircraft over land because the noise is so high. But if the noise problem can be solved, it will allow faster flights. These sloths were captured by another aircraft as they watched the two T-38 jets from Edwards Air Force Base. The aircraft with the camera is a B-200, and it is part of NASA's AirBOS (Air-to-Air Background Oriented Schlieren) program. AirBOS itself is part of NASA's commercial supersonic technology projects. These latest images come from an upgraded schlieren imaging system that can take pictures of high quality images of shockwaves than ever before. A sonic boom is created when shock waves from…

After more than 10 years of hard work, NASA has reached a milestone. We are used to NASA reaching milestones, but this one is a little different. This is about a type of photography that takes pictures of the flow of liquids.

It’s called Schlieren Photography, and the schlieren is German for “dash”. It was first developed in 1864 by a German physicist named August Toepler to study supersonic movement. Now NASA uses it to see what happens when jet aircraft break the sound barrier, to eliminate the sonic boom that accompanies it. And the pictures they get are pretty cool.

“We never dreamed it would be so clear, this beautiful.”

&#821

1; Physical Scientist J.T. Heineck by NASA’s Ames Research.

However, there is more than eye-candy. It is part of the effort to create quieter supersonic aircraft. Right now there are strict rules on flying supersonic aircraft over land because the noise is so high. But if the noise problem can be solved, it will allow faster flights.

These sloths were captured by another aircraft as they watched the two T-38 jets from Edwards Air Force Base. The aircraft with the camera is a B-200, and it is part of NASA’s AirBOS (Air-to-Air Background Oriented Schlieren) program. AirBOS itself is part of NASA’s commercial supersonic technology projects.

These latest images come from an upgraded schlieren imaging system that can take pictures of high quality images of shockwaves than ever before. A sonic boom is created when shock waves from different parts of the aircraft merge and travel through the atmosphere. Detailed images like these will deepen the study of the Sonic Boom phenomenon.

 More Shockwave Eye Candy from NASA's Schlieren Imaging System. Image Credit: NASA More shockwave eye sugar from NASA’s sloth image system. A “knife edge” shot of a T-38 in supersonic flight. Image Credit: NASA

“We never dreamed it would be that beautiful, this beautiful. I’m ecstatic about how these pictures turned out,” said JT Heineck, Physical Researcher at NASA’s Ames Research Center. “With this upgraded system We have, through an order of magnitude, improved both the care rate and the quality of previous research. “

The data from these sloths images will be used to design a test aircraft. The aircraft, called X-59 Quiet Supersonic Technology X-Plane, will be A 94 ft long, 29.5 ft wide single-jet aircraft. X-59 is part of what NASA calls Low-Boom Flight Demonstration (LBFD.) The goal of completion is once in 2021. (Better hurry, NASA.)

 An illustration of X-59 Low-Boom Flight Demonstration (LBFD) vehicle. Image Credit: NASA. An illustration of the vehicle X-59 Low-Boom Flight Demonstration (LBFD) Image Credit: NASA.

Pair of T-38s flying in a tight formation at s impersonal speeds. The main aircraft is about 30 feet in front of the subsequent aircraft, and they are vertically compensated by about 10 meters. It is not so much for highly educated USAF pilots, but it was an extra wrinkle. The B-200 was at approximately 30,000 feet, with T-38s 2000 meters below, closer than the previous formation system allowed. And the T-38s had to reach supersonic speeds at the moment they flew under the B-200 and its sluier formation system.

 One of the biggest challenges in the flight series was timing. In order to acquire this image, originally monochromatic and shown here as a colored composite image, NASA flew a B-200, equipped with an updated imaging system, at about 30,000 feet while the pair of T-38s were required not only to remain in formation, but to fly at supersonic speeds at the exact moment they were directly under the B-200. The pictures were captured as a result of all three aircraft being in exactly the right place at exactly the right time designated by NASA's operation team. Credits: NASA Photo One of the biggest challenges in the flight series was timing. In order to acquire this image, originally monochromatic and shown here as a colored composite image, NASA flew a B-200, equipped with an updated imaging system, at about 30,000 feet while the pair of T-38s were required not only to remain in formation, but to fly at supersonic speeds at the exact moment they were directly under the B-200. The pictures were captured as a result of all three aircraft being in exactly the right place at exactly the right time designated by NASA’s operation team.
Payments: NASA Photo

“The biggest challenge was to try to get the timing correctly make sure we could get those pictures.” Heather Maliska, AirBOS subproject manager.

– Heather Maliska, AirBOS subproject manager.

“The biggest challenge was trying to get the timing correct to make sure we could get those pictures,” said Heather Maliska, AirBOS subproject manager. The cameras can only record for about three seconds, and the short recording window must coincide with the exact three seconds that the T-38s were under the B-200. “I am completely satisfied with how the team could pull this off. Our business team has done this kind of operation before. They know how to get the control up and our NASA pilots and air force pilots did a good job where they needed to be.” 19659020] “What is interesting is, if you look at the rear T-38, see these shocks kind of interaction in a curve,” he said. “This is because the subsequent T-38 flies in the wake of the leading airplane, so the shocks will be shaped differently. These tasks will really help us deepen our understanding of how these shocks interact.”

A level of detail that never seen before

“We see a physical level of detail here that I don’t think anyone has ever seen before,” says Dan Banks, senior research engineer at NASA Armstrong. “I’m just looking at data for the first time, I think things worked better than we had imagined. This is a very big step. “

The new schlieren imaging system has some upgrades to previous versions, it has a wider angle lens than previous systems, allowing for a more precise positioning of the aircraft. It also has a faster frame rate. At 1400 frames per second, it is much easier It also has faster data storage systems to follow with its increased frame rate. An older image from the previous image system shows a single T-38 in what is called “transonic flight,” the exact moment the aircraft transitions from sub-sonic to supersonic flight. Image Credit: NASA” class=”wp-image-141701″ srcset=”https://www.universetoday.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/f2p6n_hs_color_0-882×1024.jpg 882w, https://www.universetoday.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/f2p6n_hs_color_0-215×250.jpg 215w, https://www.universetoday.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/f2p6n_hs_color_0-500×580.jpg 500w, https://www.universetoday.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/f2p6n_hs_color_0-768×891.jpg 768w, https://www.universetoday.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/f2p6n_hs_color_0.jpg 1041w” sizes=”(max-width: 767px) 89vw, (max-width: 1000px) 54vw, (max-width: 1071px) 543px, 580px”/> An older image from the previous image system shows one only T-38 in what is called “transonic flight”, the exact moment The aircraft is moving from subsonic to supersonic flight. make assembly easier and faster.

“With previous iterations of AirBOS it a week or more to integrate the camera system on the aircraft and make it work. This time we were able to get in and work within one day, says Tiffany Titus, airline operator. “It is time that the research group can use to go out and fly and get that information.”

The T-38 and Schlieren imaging system is only part of the NASA Supersonic Commercial Technology Project. In the picture above, a NASA test pilot performs a silent supersonic dive operation outside Galveston, Texas, to create a quieter version of the sonic boom, for recruiting community survey feedback data. The test pilot climbs to about 50,000 feet followed by a supersonic inverted dive. This creates sound waves so that they are quieter in a particular area. At the same time, NASA researchers match community feedback to the noise levels of the flights, using an electronic survey and ground-based microphone monitoring stations. This prepares NASA for community response models for future X-59 QueSST.

NASA has been working on silent supersonic flight for a long time, and they have used a variety of ways to study it. Wind tunnels have been used, as they are in all aircraft designs, but NASA came in a different way. About three years ago they used the sun as a background to form the sound waves from supersonic jets. Check out the video below from CNN.

Commercial Supersonic Technology Project not only focuses on reducing the noise of audio bits. It also looks at fuel efficiency, emissions and structural weight and flexibility, all of which prevent better air travel. Collected data will be shared with regulatory agencies in the United States and around the world.

Share
Published by
Faela