Categories: world

This incredible Hubble snapshot of a galaxy cluster took an incredible amount of work to pull off – BGR

Hubble can approach the final life, but it is still possible for some really incredible achievements. A new image sewn…

Hubble can approach the final life, but it is still possible for some really incredible achievements. A new image sewn together from several Hubble snapshots has given astronauts an amazing insight into a distant collection of galaxies called the Coma cluster, and the boy is still here.

The divide, says NASA, consists of over 1,000 galaxies. It is not the number of stars or planets, but 1,000 galaxies . Yes, it’s huge, and although it’s about 300 million light years away from the earth, Hubble’s observations have revealed tens of thousands of ancient clusters that fill the space between nearby galaxies.

In a new post, NASA tells Hubbel’s sharp resolution enough for researchers to identify 22,426 clusters of stars scattered within the larger Comakluster. NASA calls these “the earliest homesteaders in the universe,” saying that they act as “snowdrop-shaped islands of hundreds of thousands of ancient stars”.

Astronomer Juan Madrid from the Australian Telescope National Facility in Australia and his team, worked to construct the mosaic of many different Hubble images to paint a more detailed image of the cluster. The group built computer algorithms to combine Hubble image archives into the cluster and then matched them with other snapshots from a variety of observation campaigns.

The final result is this crazy detailed glimpse of a collection of galaxies and star clusters that you can never see with the naked eye. I strongly recommend that you look at the full-size image to fully appreciate the insane number of items displayed.

It’s a bit crazy to think about, but Hubble originally started far back in 1

990 and has been in service for almost 29 years already. It’s an incredibly powerful hardware and it’s still one of NASA’s best tools to study the depth of space.

Image Source: NASA, ESA, J. Mack (STScI) and J. Madrid (Australian Telescope National Facility)


Source link

Share
Published by
Faela