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The Texas girl's ooperative brain tumor disappears miraculously

An 11-year-old Texas girl recently diagnosed with an inoperable brain tumor seems to be cured – allowed her doctor to be mystified according to a report. Roxli Doss and her parents learned in June that she suffered from diffuse internal ponting gland or DIPG, a very aggressive brain tumor, after she began to suffer from headache, KVUE reported. "Headache developed into nausea and she also had a double vision," said her dad Scott Doss news Scott and his wife, Gena, took their daughter to several doctors, including a neurologist who delivered the bad news. "It was very bad," Scott said. "It was the worst news we could have had." Dr. Virginia Harrod from the Dell Children's Medical Center said that DIPG "is very rare, but when we see it, it's a devastating disease." "You have impaired ability to swallow, sometimes loss of vision, reduced ability to talk, finally hard to breathe," she said. Roxli underwent radiation weeks as her Buda society rallied by having an advantage to her in August when all her parents could do where to pray for a miracle. "And We Got It", a "God's God, we did," Scott added. "When I first saw Roxli MRI scan, it was actually incredible," said Harrod. "The tumor is undetectable on the MRI scan, which is really unusual." Doctors have no idea why the tumor disappeared. "At Dell's Children's, Texas Children's, at Dana-Farber, at John Hopkins and MD Anderson, everyone agreed that it was DIPG," Scott said, whose daughter does…

An 11-year-old Texas girl recently diagnosed with an inoperable brain tumor seems to be cured – allowed her doctor to be mystified according to a report.

Roxli Doss and her parents learned in June that she suffered from diffuse internal ponting gland or DIPG, a very aggressive brain tumor, after she began to suffer from headache, KVUE reported.

“Headache developed into nausea and she also had a double vision,” said her dad Scott Doss news

Scott and his wife, Gena, took their daughter to several doctors, including a neurologist who delivered the bad news.

“It was very bad,” Scott said. “It was the worst news we could have had.”

Dr. Virginia Harrod from the Dell Children‘s Medical Center said that DIPG “is very rare, but when we see it, it’s a devastating disease.”

“You have impaired ability to swallow, sometimes loss of vision, reduced ability to talk, finally hard to breathe,” she said.

Roxli underwent radiation weeks as her Buda society rallied by having an advantage to her in August when all her parents could do where to pray for a miracle.

“And We Got It”, a

“God’s God, we did,” Scott added.

“When I first saw Roxli MRI scan, it was actually incredible,” said Harrod. “The tumor is undetectable on the MRI scan, which is really unusual.”

Doctors have no idea why the tumor disappeared.

“At Dell’s Children’s, Texas Children’s, at Dana-Farber, at John Hopkins and MD Anderson, everyone agreed that it was DIPG,” Scott said, whose daughter does what she loves &#821

1; riding.

“We did not know how long she would be well and look at her, she’s just amazing,” he said. “She’s as active as she ever was.”

As a precaution, Roxli continues to undergo treatment as immunotherapy.

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