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The online petition urges Disney to release the “Hakuna Matata” brand

The phrase, which roughly translates into "no problems" or "no worries" and is a common expression in parts of eastern and southern Africa, is perhaps best known as a song in Disney's 1994 hit movie "The Lion King".The company labeled the same year, according to the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office.The production, created by Zimbabwe activist Shelton Mpala, has received more than 50,000 signatures.Mpala told CNN that he started the petition "to pay attention to the enrichment of African culture and the importance of protecting our legacy, identity and culture from being exploited for financial gain from third parties." "This robbed artwork serves to enrich or Disney has not responded to CNN's request for comments. Liz Lenjo, a Kenyan intellectual property and entertainment attorney, disagrees with the petition. Lenjo said Disney "has not stolen anything" and the ounce of the brand is misplaced. The debt should go to social media to "blow things in proportion," Lenjo says. "The use of" Hakuna Matata "by Disney does not remove the language," said Lenjo. to CNN. "East Africans or those who speak Swahili all over the world are not restricted from using the phrase." She added: "The Internet call has blown up because of a misunderstanding and misunderstanding of intellectual property rights, ethos behind intellectual property rights and the various protection systems." A remake of "The Lion King" is expected to be released in 201 9.

The phrase, which roughly translates into “no problems” or “no worries” and is a common expression in parts of eastern and southern Africa, is perhaps best known as a song in Disney’s 1994 hit movie “The Lion King”.

The company labeled the same year, according to the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office.

The production, created by Zimbabwe activist Shelton Mpala, has received more than 50,000 signatures.

Mpala told CNN that he started the petition “to pay attention to the enrichment of African culture and the importance of protecting our legacy, identity and culture from being exploited for financial gain from third parties.”

“This robbed artwork serves to enrich or

Disney has not responded to CNN’s request for comments.

Liz Lenjo, a Kenyan intellectual property and entertainment attorney, disagrees with the petition. Lenjo said Disney “has not stolen anything” and the ounce of the brand is misplaced. The debt should go to social media to “blow things in proportion,” Lenjo says.

“The use of” Hakuna Matata “by Disney does not remove the language,” said Lenjo. to CNN. “East Africans or those who speak Swahili all over the world are not restricted from using the phrase.”

She added: “The Internet call has blown up because of a misunderstanding and misunderstanding of intellectual property rights, ethos behind intellectual property rights and the various protection systems.”

A remake of “The Lion King” is expected to be released in 201

9.

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