Categories: world

The N.C. board explains a new election in the contested house race after the GOP candidate admitted misconception during oath.

BREAKING NEWS: Mark Harris, testifying this afternoon to the North Carolina State Board of Elections, said a new election was justified in the tough competition, which Harris led with 905 votes. Earlier Thursday, Harris said he did not know anything about an alleged voting order led by an operative he employee to work in his 2018 campaign. This is a developing story and will be updated. RALEIGH, NC – ] Republican congressional candidate Mark Harris says a new election in the North Carolina 9th Congress District is justified by allegations of vote voting. Harris, testifying this afternoon to the North Carolina State Board of Elections, said a new election was warranted in the tough competition, which Harris led with 905 votes. He said he was recovering from an infection that led to sepsis and two strokes, and that he realized that he was not prepared for "hardness" in this hearing. "I think a new election should be called," Harris said. develops gasps from the hearing room in Raleigh. "It has become clear to me that the general confidence in the 9th district has been undermined to the extent that a new election is justified." Earlier Thursday, Harris said he didn't know anything about an alleged lawsuit being led by an operative he employed to work in his 21 08 campaign. Harris's testimony came the day after his son, John Harris, a federal prosecutor, testifying to the warnings he offered to his father in phone calls and emails that he believed…

BREAKING NEWS: Mark Harris, testifying this afternoon to the North Carolina State Board of Elections, said a new election was justified in the tough competition, which Harris led with 905 votes. Earlier Thursday, Harris said he did not know anything about an alleged voting order led by an operative he employee to work in his 2018 campaign.

This is a developing story and will be updated.

] Republican congressional candidate Mark Harris says a new election in the North Carolina 9th Congress District is justified by allegations of vote voting.

Harris, testifying this afternoon to the North Carolina State Board of Elections, said a new election was warranted in the tough competition, which Harris led with 905 votes. He said he was recovering from an infection that led to sepsis and two strokes, and that he realized that he was not prepared for “hardness” in this hearing.

“I think a new election should be called,” Harris said. develops gasps from the hearing room in Raleigh. “It has become clear to me that the general confidence in the 9th district has been undermined to the extent that a new election is justified.”

Earlier Thursday, Harris said he didn’t know anything about an alleged lawsuit being led by an operative he employed to work in his 21

08 campaign.

Harris’s testimony came the day after his son, John Harris, a federal prosecutor, testifying to the warnings he offered to his father in phone calls and emails that he believed the operative had broken the law in a previous election.

In his own testimony, the older Harris he has in previous interviews with reporters held that he did not know the red flags of the operative alleged tactics – despite what his son told him in the spring of 2017.

Harris said he did not follow his son’s advice in part because John Harris was only 27 at the time adding that the younger Harris is “a bit judgmental and has a small taste of a rrogance and some other things. my heart. “

Harris, a Baptist minister, took the position on the fourth day of dramatic hearings for allegations of widespread fraud in the 9th Congress District, the last undefined congress in the country. Harris leads 905 votes to Democrat Dan McCready.

Harris said he hired the operator Leslie McCrae Dowless on the advice of a number of Republican friends and colleagues. He said he believed Dowless when he offered to run a legal absentee voting program for Harris campaign.

Harris’s testimony followed the dramatic opening sessions of Thursday’s hearings, where Josh Lawson, General Executive of the State Executive Board, revealed a letter confirming Harris’s campaign lawyers to fail to reverse the email messages between Harris and his son to 15 minutes before John Harris arrived Wednesday.

“The timing of your enlightenment raises significant and material concerns about the committee’s compliance and joy before and now during the hearing,” Lawson wrote. He said John Harris’ subsequent testimony “strongly suggests” that the campaign’s explanation – that the issue of emails had been incomplete – “was not correct.”

Lawson also asked Harris if he had had any conversations this week and described his understanding that E-mail exchanges with his son would not be part of the evidence to be presented at the hearing. Harris said he didn’t remember – three times to Lawson and once to Marc Elias, the lawyer for Harris’s democratic opponent, Dan McCready.

When he answered Elias, Harris lawyer David Freedman suddenly stood up and asked the chairman of the board, Bob Cordle, if he could speak to the board privately.

Before the interrogation was paused for the closed session, Harris explained at the testimony how he had met Dowless – the 63-year-old native of Bladen County at the center of a suspected polling program that left the 9th district in limbo since November, when the board refused to certify a winner and launched a survey instead. The district stretches along the South Carolina border from Charlotte to the Eastern North Carolina countryside.

Dowless was a “good ole boy” who “ate, slept, and drank” politics and was recommended to him by a former prime minister, Harris said. He met Dowless in 2017 at a local furniture store in the 9th district, and the two, along with other Republicans, sat on couches in the store’s showroom so Dowless could describe his absentee voting operation.

Harris had heard that Dowless was responsible for delivering an overwhelming share of the absent voting vote in the 2016 Republican primary for Todd Johnson, which Harris had lost to the existing then Robert Pittenger. Harris still realized he had lost to Pittenger with so few votes and thought he had won if he had hired Dowless that year.

“I turned to McCrae and said,” Well, what makes you so special? What are you doing? “Harris recalled.

Harris said Dowless explained to him that his business was strictly legal. He would hire workers who would collect voter voting and return as soon as the actual polls were sent out and help voters fill in and send vote. “We are not voting,” Harris recalled the operative saying. Collecting or filling another voter’s vote is a crime in North Carolina.

Harris’s testimony made skepticism by some board members, questioning how Dowless paid their workers for each voting application form that they turned in – and if it should have raised a red flag.

Harris argued very little about his campaign’s inner effects, which he said was mainly dealt with by his campaign consultant, Andy Yates of Red Dome Group. Yates ended two days of testimony on Wednesday.

On Wednesday, it said inn Grab Harrisen, now 29, offered advice to his father when considering whether to hire Dowless to pursue his absentee voting program in the 2018 Congress. He conveyed similar concerns to Yates, he said. Mark Harris rented Dowless despite his son’s worries.

At one point during his testimony, John Harris broke his voice and his father cried.

“I thought what he was doing was illegal, and I was right,” said John Harris about Dowless. He added: “I had no reason to believe that my father actually knew, or my mother or anyone else associated with the campaign had any knowledge. I think Dowless told them he didn’t do any of this, and they believed him. “

Investigators also shared an email between father and son, where the younger Harris wrote:” Good test is if you are comfortable with the full process he uses sent on the news. “

The younger Harris told the board Wednesday that he began studying absenteeism models in the 9th district in June 2016, when his father narrowly lost the Republican primary.

John Harris described digging into the numbers and discovered that posted ballots for Johnson had arrived at county elections “in parties” – which he thought suggested that they had been illegally collected by campaigns.

Harris said he told his father about his suspicions. Dowless, who refused to testify this week to avoid self-crime, is accused of doing just that in the 2018 cycle – hiring a team of workers to illegally collect, sign, forge and turn in polls.

Both Yates and Harris have denied knowledge of the alleged tactics. But in another e-mail from 2016 that was shown during testimony on Wednesday, the two Harris’s malpractices discussed that year – as was the irony that Dowless had made a complaint to pronounce elective officials that the Democrats had employed similar tactics in Bladen County.

“Guess he didn’t like Dems cut in his business!”, Elder Harris wrote.

In a television interview in early January, Mark Harris told the Spectrum News in Raleigh that reports, including one in The Washington Post, that he had been warned of Dowless’s alleged tactics, were untrue.

In his testimony on Wednesday, the younger Harris also questioned the account of Yates, whose political consulting company had paid Dowless on behalf of the campaign.

John Harris said he was surprised to hear how little surveillance Yates gave to ensure that Dowless performed the services he was paid for. He was also surprised that Yates said he was shocked to learn about Dowless’s alleged tactics when the investigation began in November.

“Mr. Yates said he was shocked and disturbed by testimony, said younger Harris.” I was disturbed. Less shocked. “

Harris said that when he warned Yates of Dowless,” Andy assured me, “Yes, we’ll make sure he does what he says he’ll do.” “

John Harris emphasized his belief that his parents did not know about Dowless’s alleged tactics, but he also acknowledged in crumpled testimony that they” wanted “to believe in Dowless – perhaps against their better judgment.

The younger Harris asked the electoral commission. if he could make any final comments after attorneys had finished their question about him.

“I love my dad, and I love my mom,” he said. “I really have no vendetta against them, no family points to settle itself. I think they made mistakes in this process, and they certainly did things differently than I would have done. “

Share
Published by
Faela