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The lawyer's lawyer fits Facebook on alleged crime offenses from the Cambridge Analytica scandal

FILE &#821 1; On March 29, 2018, file image, the Facebook screen is displayed on the Nasdaq MarketSite in New York Times Square. Facebook has announced its third and largest cleansing of military-linked accounts in Myanmar, where critics have claimed that the social network did little to block inflammatory material that ran municipal hatred, especially against the country's Muslim Rohingya minority. (AP Photo / Richard Drew, file) Tony Romm Staff Author of Technology Policy December 19 at 12:03 Attorney General for District of Columbia filed a lawsuit Wednesday against Facebook to allow Cambridge Analytica, a political consultation, to access the names "likes" and other personal data about tens of millions of social network users without their permission. The process filed by Karl Racine confirmed Wednesday with two people familiar with the matter but not authorized to speak on record, marking the first major effort of US regulatory authorities to punish the technology giant for joining the company. It may delay even tougher fines and other penalties that will still come to Facebook, as further state and federal investigations continue. Facebook did not respond immediately to requests. The process comes as Facebook continues to face criticism around the world to abuse its users' personal data. On Friday, for example, the company announced that some users' photos may have been incorrectly accessed by third party apps. On Tuesday, new details emerged about Facebook's extensive information sharing with business partners, including Amazon and Spotify. The report from The New York Times quickly triggered…


FILE &#821

1; On March 29, 2018, file image, the Facebook screen is displayed on the Nasdaq MarketSite in New York Times Square. Facebook has announced its third and largest cleansing of military-linked accounts in Myanmar, where critics have claimed that the social network did little to block inflammatory material that ran municipal hatred, especially against the country’s Muslim Rohingya minority. (AP Photo / Richard Drew, file)

Attorney General for District of Columbia filed a lawsuit Wednesday against Facebook to allow Cambridge Analytica, a political consultation, to access the names “likes” and other personal data about tens of millions of social network users without their permission.

The process filed by Karl Racine confirmed Wednesday with two people familiar with the matter but not authorized to speak on record, marking the first major effort of US regulatory authorities to punish the technology giant for joining the company. It may delay even tougher fines and other penalties that will still come to Facebook, as further state and federal investigations continue.

Facebook did not respond immediately to requests.

The process comes as Facebook continues to face criticism around the world to abuse its users’ personal data. On Friday, for example, the company announced that some users’ photos may have been incorrectly accessed by third party apps.

On Tuesday, new details emerged about Facebook’s extensive information sharing with business partners, including Amazon and Spotify. The report from The New York Times quickly triggered another round call from Capitol Hill for the technicians to be penalized.

For this purpose, a person familiar with the new DC trial said that it is likely to change in the future to include later allegations of incorrect data collection and usage. This person, who spoke on terms of anonymity to discuss issues that are not yet public, said that several states are also investigating Facebook.

Facebook’s problem with Cambridge Analytica came to light in March, after a whistleblower, Christopher Wylie, revealed that the political company was trying to create “psychographic” profiles of social media users and target them with messages that had their hope and fear. Before it was closed, Cambridge Analytica had for a time been run by Steve Bannon, who was the company’s vice president and later served as top advisor to President Trump.

Cambridge Analytica used data collected in 2014 by a quiz, which collected information about those who used it and their friends, which numbered in hundreds for many users. These data included names, hometowns, religious and educational backgrounds, friend lists and other data, researchers said at that time. Overall, Cambridge Analytica’s effort gained insight into more than 87 million users around the world, including 71 million Americans, as Facebook previously revealed.

The revelation released unforeseen global review of Facebook’s privacy practices and a wave of investigations, including the United States, where Facebook is now facing the prospect of serious fines

The federal investigation with the Security and Exchange Commission, the Federal Trade Commission and the Justice Department has been going on for several months and partly focuses on whether Facebook’s representations to investors regarding the Cambridge Analytica scandal have been complete and correct. The FTC also investigates whether Facebook’s relationship with Cambridge Analytica – and its management of user data – violated a 2011 agreement authorized by the Agency that required the technologies to improve their privacy practices.

Regulators in Britain announced earlier this year they would punish Facebook – a fine of $ 625,000 – but the company has questioned it in court. Earlier, Facebook refused to make its CEO Mark Zuckerberg available to testify to UK legislators and eight other countries who are still concerned about the Cambridge Analytica controversy.

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