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The Brexit dream can become fading

British Prime Minister Theresa met with the leader of the Great Opposition Party, Jeremy Corbyn, to seek a compromise aimed at having her Brexit deal approved by the House of Commons legislature. Both sides said the meeting was "constructive" but "undoubtedly". If he is to agree on the bail out in May, Corbyn will require the prime minister to recognize some of her red lines on Brexit. This is where things get interesting. Work wants to secure a permanent customs union with the EU, which would be considered a betrayal by many of the corn conservative MPs. A large number of Corbyn's colleagues in the Labor Party also believe he should demand a big prize for his support: a commitment from May to hold a "confirmatory" general vote on any agreement approved by Parliament. Put simply, a second referendum. This is where things become even more interesting. Holding a confirmatory vote would require Brexit to be delayed. It would keep the UK in the EU beyond April 1 2. This is important because it is the UK deadline to confirm whether it will participate in the European Parliament elections – something that all EU Member States must do. 19659003] A prolonged delay in combination with a public vote commitment raises a very important issue: Would it remain in the EU an alternative? Senior members of Corbyn's law are in favor of it. Earlier in the day, Emily Thornberry, Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs, wrote a letter to her colleagues…

British Prime Minister Theresa met with the leader of the Great Opposition Party, Jeremy Corbyn, to seek a compromise aimed at having her Brexit deal approved by the House of Commons legislature. Both sides said the meeting was “constructive” but “undoubtedly”.

If he is to agree on the bail out in May, Corbyn will require the prime minister to recognize some of her red lines on Brexit. This is where things get interesting.

Work wants to secure a permanent customs union with the EU, which would be considered a betrayal by many of the corn conservative MPs.

A large number of Corbyn’s colleagues in the Labor Party also believe he should demand a big prize for his support: a commitment from May to hold a “confirmatory” general vote on any agreement approved by Parliament. Put simply, a second referendum.

This is where things become even more interesting. Holding a confirmatory vote would require Brexit to be delayed. It would keep the UK in the EU beyond April 1

2. This is important because it is the UK deadline to confirm whether it will participate in the European Parliament elections – something that all EU Member States must do. 19659003] A prolonged delay in combination with a public vote commitment raises a very important issue: Would it remain in the EU an alternative?

Senior members of Corbyn’s law are in favor of it. Earlier in the day, Emily Thornberry, Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs, wrote a letter to her colleagues saying that “any agreement approved by Parliament must be subject to a confirmatory public vote, and yes, the second option in the vote must remain.”

Although Corbyn himself was coy on a second referendum, it is popular with his MPs and his grassroots base. Supporting a public vote would be consistent with Labor Schrodinger’s Brexit policy: It allows Corbyn to tell Europhile party members that he has been able to stay in the EU on the table, while committing a Brexit deal to please labor selectors in areas that voted heavily to leave.

All of this can, of course, be hypothetical, since an extension of the Article 50 procedure – the legal mechanism that facilitates Brexit – requires all other EU-27 Member States to agree on it. But if the EU summit last month taught us something, it is that the EU under no circumstances wants to blame for a lack of landing at its feet.

The political will to stop an agreement is not just limited to Europe. The only fact that Theresa May has come out to Labor Party makes it clear that she would prefer a softer Brexit over an unfortunate accident.

As recently as last week, some sources ran near the prime minister that she was ready for a no deal. But hard Brexiteers have never forgotten what can be supported in the referendum and have surrounded themselves with Remain-supporting allies.

The resistance to no agreement was revealed as today’s Brexit action closed. The MPs finally did not make a settlement from the table. The so-called Cooper Bill, named after Labor MP Yvette Cooper, who presented it, passed the Commons, albeit with a single vote. The bill compels May to request an extension of the Article 50 process if she cannot get her business approved. Members of Parliament would then need to extend the end point of this request.

The government loses control of Brexit. In an attempt to hold onto power, May has made some enormous concessions. It has caused an omnipotent line in its party. Most hard-core Brexiteer MPs are conservative. They see the events of the week as a treason from a prime minister allowing Brexit’s dream to appear on the vine. Anger among her MPs is palpable. In the weekend with the prime minister’s questions, May faces hostile heavy lashings from their own conservatives.

 Will a second Brexit referendum be inevitable?

Brexiteer Julian Lewis asked: “Why is a conservative prime minister who repeatedly told us that no agreement is better than a bad deal, now Labor MPs are approaching to block the WTO Brexit when most conservative MEPs want us to leave the EU Union with a clean nine-day break? “His colleague, Caroline Johnson, followed up. “If it comes to the point that we have the balance, the risk of a lack of Brexit against the risk of releasing the country and launching a Marxist anti-Semitic government at that time is the lowest risk,” she asked, referring to the anti-Semitism crisis in the Labor Party .

Conservatives are furious that their prime minister is selling them and handing over the country’s keys to a man they believe is a risk to national security.

But they just have to blame themselves. As a still supportive conservative MP previously explained to me: “This is a group of people who … voted for the recall agreement three times, whinging that the prime minister is trying to seek a majority in parliament. This is not” t just a mistake, it is complete hypocrisy. “


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