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Sri Lanka attacks: Sister of “leaders” regret attacks

CaptionsZahran Hashim was not widely known in Sri Lanka until this week A young mother of two in Kattankudy's coastal town, Sri Lanka, sits in disbelief. Mohammad Hashim Madaniya has discovered that her brother, Zahran Hashim, is the alleged leader of a group of suicide bombers who attacked churches and hotels in Sri Lanka on Easter Sunday and killed more than 350 people. She says she is upset by what he has done and fears what may happen next. She has been interviewed by the police but is not treated as a suspect. It is still not clear whether Hashim, who is accused of leading a group of bombers (alleged to include two sons of a rich tycoon), lives or dies. With a white scarf, Madaniya sits uncomfortably in the humidity of Kattankudy, a predominantly Muslim city overlooking the Indian Ocean. She is completely unhappy with the attention she receives. She is the youngest of five siblings and Hashim, who is believed to be about 40, is the oldest. She insists that she has not been in contact with her brother since 201 7, when he went underground after police tried to seize him over violence between ideologically opposed Muslim groups. Since Sunday's attacks, a video has emerged where a man believed to be Zahran Hashim appears credible to the leader of the Islamic State (IS) group, Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi. Hans is the only face that is visible among eight men who are told that IS has carried out the…

 Zahran Hashim

Captions

Zahran Hashim was not widely known in Sri Lanka until this week

A young mother of two in Kattankudy’s coastal town, Sri Lanka, sits in disbelief.

Mohammad Hashim Madaniya has discovered that her brother, Zahran Hashim, is the alleged leader of a group of suicide bombers who attacked churches and hotels in Sri Lanka on Easter Sunday and killed more than 350 people.

She says she is upset by what he has done and fears what may happen next. She has been interviewed by the police but is not treated as a suspect.

It is still not clear whether Hashim, who is accused of leading a group of bombers (alleged to include two sons of a rich tycoon), lives or dies.

With a white scarf, Madaniya sits uncomfortably in the humidity of Kattankudy, a predominantly Muslim city overlooking the Indian Ocean.

She is completely unhappy with the attention she receives.

She is the youngest of five siblings and Hashim, who is believed to be about 40, is the oldest. She insists that she has not been in contact with her brother since 201

7, when he went underground after police tried to seize him over violence between ideologically opposed Muslim groups.

Since Sunday’s attacks, a video has emerged where a man believed to be Zahran Hashim appears credible to the leader of the Islamic State (IS) group, Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi.

Hans is the only face that is visible among eight men who are told that IS has carried out the attacks.

Sri Lankan police say there were a total of nine attackers, including a woman, and that they were all homegrown. They are described as “educated” and “middle class” – with one who has studied in the UK and Australia. Two were sons of a prominent spice dealer who is now in storage, and one of the women’s wives blew up during a raid on Sunday and killed her two children and several police officers, police sources say.

“I came to know his business only through the media. I never thought he would do such a thing,” Madaniya says of her brother.

“I strongly regret what he did. Even though he is my brother, I cannot accept this. I no longer care about him.”

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Kattankudy’s Muslims fear retaliation because the preacher came from their City

Her brother, a radical Islamist preacher, came to local appearances a few years ago, after posting several videos on YouTube and other social media condemning non-believers.

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The video triggered concerns among other Muslims, who are a minority in the Buddhist majority Sri Lanka. Community leaders have said that they repeatedly touched on authorities but were ignored. Officials say they couldn’t trace him after he hid.

But few had expected a part-time teacher from a small town in eastern Sri Lanka to organize the deadliest suicide bombings in this war-force history, attracting global attention and re-examining links between local extremists and international groups such as Islamic State (IS).

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White Flags Are Hanged in Cat Tanks to Shame the Dead

“We had a very good relationship during our childhood. He was very friendly with everyone in the neighborhood. But in the last two years he has not been in contact with us,” says Mrs Madaniya.

It is still not clear if Hashim had direct contact with IS or if he was a local jihadist who promised faithfully to the group, who claimed the attack.

Kattankudy is near the town of Batticaloa, where the Zion Church was bombed on Easter Sunday killing at least 28 people.

The city, with less than 50,000 people, has now been pushed into the limelight.

When I tried to find Hashim’s ancestor house, many were not willing to answer. People were afraid to talk about him.

Since the bombing, Muslim society has been on the verge of anxiety.

“That someone from our area has been linked to the attacks is really worrying for us. We are shocked We believe in harmony and unity,” says Mohammad Ibrahim Mohammad Zubair, leader of the Federation of Kattankudy Mosques.

During my visit, Kattankudy was closed. on a day of protest against the carnage Black and white bands fluttered along the main roads as a hallmark of respect for the dead

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The mosque Zahran Hashim was founded with hundreds of followers – but is now empty

Zubair said he met the radical preacher several years ago and talked to him about his Islamic traditions, which differed from common local practices. He said the society was violent violence and that it took all steps to stop young people being radicalized.

Hashim began as a small-time preacher, but his sister soon soon received attention and admiration in some places because of his teachings.

As his popularity grew. He walked around the region and preached Islam.

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When the Islamic groups refused to allow him to talk to their congregations because of his hard opinions, he began his own outfit, National Thoughheed Jamaath (NTJ) in Kattankudy.

He also built a mosque near the beach and kept prayers and classes inside the building. After his controversial hat-specific perceptions on social media say the locals were expelled from the NTJ. He simply disappeared but continued to send burning videos from hiding. There is some skepticism locally if he really links up with the group he founded.

Sri Lanka’s Deputy Defense Minister Ruwan Wijewardene has said that a splinter group originated from the original NTJ.

Image Textion

Mohammad Ibrahim Mohammad Zubair says society does not support extremists

It’s still not clear whether Zahran Hashim was one of the suicide bombers.

But one thing seems clear: As the government pointed out, those who carried out the bombing must have received help from abroad.

During our conversation, Hashim’s sister also revealed that her older parents had left their home in the same area a few days before Easter Sunday, and that she had not heard from them since.

“It makes me think that my brother could have been in contact with them,” she said. The authorities are also trying to trace Hashim’s younger brother.

Muslim leaders here claim that Hashim was an aberration and that their society, like all Sri Lankans, is saddened by what they see as meaningless attacks.

But the fear of retaliation in this small town is very correct.

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Media script The film shows a man wearing a large backpack that goes quietly against St Sebastian’s church [19659053]
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