Categories: world

SpaceX's Crew Dragon comes down to the Atlantic after successful ISS missions

Elon Musk & # 39; s Crew Dragon recently made history when it managed to dock at the International Space Station (ISS), making it the first commercial mission to fly to the ISS. And this Friday, the spacecraft certainly made it back to earth, albeit a little rusty. In an update, NASA shared a video clip showing Crew Dragon descending to the Atlantic, approximately 230 miles off Cape Canaveral, Florida. In the clip, the spacecraft is seen landing on water slowly with the help of four parachutes. NASA stated that the successful splashdown happened the right time at 8:45 am ET. "We were all very excited to see re-entry, parachute and drug deploy, the main equipment, splashdown – everything just happened perfectly. It was right in time, the way we expected it to be. It was beautiful," said Benji Reed, head of crew management at SpaceX. SpaceX quickly picked up Crew Dragon from the sea. Musk's company shared a photo on the spacecraft on a recycling vessel on Twitter. Inside the room is the space crash test, the name Ripley. Outside the space the vehicle looks burnt out. NASA administrator Jim Bridenstine said in a press release that the successful re-entry and recovery of the capsule marked another milestone in the future of human space flight. He added that the overall success of Crew Dragon could only mean that NASA and SpaceX are one step closer to launching American astronauts using US rockets from US land. Bridenstine apparently referred to…

Elon Musk & # 39; s Crew Dragon recently made history when it managed to dock at the International Space Station (ISS), making it the first commercial mission to fly to the ISS. And this Friday, the spacecraft certainly made it back to earth, albeit a little rusty.

In an update, NASA shared a video clip showing Crew Dragon descending to the Atlantic, approximately 230 miles off Cape Canaveral, Florida. In the clip, the spacecraft is seen landing on water slowly with the help of four parachutes. NASA stated that the successful splashdown happened the right time at 8:45 am ET.

NASA administrator Jim Bridenstine said in a press release that the successful re-entry and recovery of the capsule marked another milestone in the future of human space flight. He added that the overall success of Crew Dragon could only mean that NASA and SpaceX are one step closer to launching American astronauts using US rockets from US land.

Bridenstine apparently referred to the fact that for years the United States has relied on Russia’s Soyuz rockets and spacecraft to bring their American astronauts to and from the ISS. This has been the setting ever since NASA interrupted its space shuttle in July 2011. It is a costly approach to keep as every seat on Soyuz spacecraft costs $ 80 million, according to Space.com.

The mission, called Demo-1, took off on March 2 and circled the earth 18 times before finally ending up next to the space station. The Crew Dragon capsule looked slowly and docked to the ISS and the astronauts emptied the 400-pound supplies that it carried with Ripley. Five days later, the craft resigned from the space station and began to deorbit until it came down to earth on Friday.

Researchers are now expected to study all data retrieved by Ripley’s sensors to identify and predict the possible effects of spacecraft travel on human passengers. They will then renovate Crew Dragon for a new mission aimed at conducting an abortion test during flight.

Share
Published by
Faela