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SpaceX makes history by completing the first private crew capsule mission – TechCrunch

SpaceXs The Crew Dragon Capsule has surely splashed into the Atlantic, making it the first private spacecraft ship for spacecraft ever to complete a mission to the International Space Station. It is one of several first SpaceX plans this year, but Boeing is warm on his heels with a crew announcer by himself – and of course the real test does the same with astronauts on board. This mission, Demo-1, SpaceX had shown that its Crew Dragon capsule, a development of the carrying dragon that has made many ISS deliveries, was complete and ready to take on its eponymous crew. It took off early in the morning of March 2 (still March 1 on the west coast) circled the earth 18 times, and eventually eventually (relatively speaking of course) connected to the ISS, after which it approached and docked with the new international docking adapter. The 400 pounds of supplies were emptied, but the "anthropomorphic test unit", called Ripley – basically a space crash test dummy – stopped in its seat on board. (It is also worth noting that the Falcon 9 first step that took the canister to the edge of the atmosphere landed autonomously on a drone ship.) Five days later – very early this morning – the booklet was lifted from ISS and started the deorbiteration process. It landed on schedule at 8:45 in the morning east time. It is a great validation of NASA's commercial crew program and, of course, a triumph for SpaceX, which not…

SpaceXs The Crew Dragon Capsule has surely splashed into the Atlantic, making it the first private spacecraft ship for spacecraft ever to complete a mission to the International Space Station. It is one of several first SpaceX plans this year, but Boeing is warm on his heels with a crew announcer by himself – and of course the real test does the same with astronauts on board.

This mission, Demo-1, SpaceX had shown that its Crew Dragon capsule, a development of the carrying dragon that has made many ISS deliveries, was complete and ready to take on its eponymous crew.

It took off early in the morning of March 2 (still March 1

on the west coast) circled the earth 18 times, and eventually eventually (relatively speaking of course) connected to the ISS, after which it approached and docked with the new international docking adapter. The 400 pounds of supplies were emptied, but the “anthropomorphic test unit”, called Ripley – basically a space crash test dummy – stopped in its seat on board.

(It is also worth noting that the Falcon 9 first step that took the canister to the edge of the atmosphere landed autonomously on a drone ship.)

Five days later – very early this morning – the booklet was lifted from ISS and started the deorbiteration process. It landed on schedule at 8:45 in the morning east time.

It is a great validation of NASA’s commercial crew program and, of course, a triumph for SpaceX, which not only created and launched a functioning spacecraft, but did so before its rival Boeing. It is said that it is not a winner who takes everything – the two spacecraft may well exist in healthy competition, as crew receptions to space are becoming more common.

Expect to see a report on the mission soon after SpaceX and NASA have had time to break and investigate the boat (and Ripley).


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