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SpaceX changes the Falcon 9 booster from the landing plate to drone the ship after anomaly

SpaceX officially confirmed that it will move the location of a Falcon 9 booster after its launch, to better maintain the location of the Crew Dragon disastrous April 20 bug. Instead of returning booster to one of SpaceX's two Cape Canaveral Landing Zones (LZs), SpaceX has applied for an FCC permit to land the rocket less than 20 miles off the Florida coast on the drone ship I still love you (OCISLY). The repentance for the last change of plans is a catastrophic failure of the Crew Dragon who spreads debris through SpaceX's Landing Zone facilities, debris that will now be crucial to the process of deviation resolution. Landing a Falcon 9 booster at LZ-1 or 2 would always spread Crew Dragon's garbage and complicate the fault investigation even further. SpaceX confirms droneship landing for the upcoming ISS delivery mission. The landing site is not an option due to Saturday anomaly: "To ensure the integrity of the area and to maintain valuable information, we will likely attempt to land Falcon 9 droneship during the CRS-17 mission." – Eric Berger @SciGuySpace) April 23, 2019 As a tornado passing a crime scene would likely impede the value of that crime scene and any related investigations, a Falcon 9 booster landing at a new accident investigation would investigate being a extremely unpleasant complication. Even with a single Merlin 1D engine shooting under a Falcon 9's landing firing, the engine exhaust manifold departs for about 2.7 km / s and can easily send Crew…

SpaceX officially confirmed that it will move the location of a Falcon 9 booster after its launch, to better maintain the location of the Crew Dragon disastrous April 20 bug.

Instead of returning booster to one of SpaceX’s two Cape Canaveral Landing Zones (LZs), SpaceX has applied for an FCC permit to land the rocket less than 20 miles off the Florida coast on the drone ship I still love you (OCISLY). The repentance for the last change of plans is a catastrophic failure of the Crew Dragon who spreads debris through SpaceX’s Landing Zone facilities, debris that will now be crucial to the process of deviation resolution. Landing a Falcon 9 booster at LZ-1

or 2 would always spread Crew Dragon’s garbage and complicate the fault investigation even further.

As a tornado passing a crime scene would likely impede the value of that crime scene and any related investigations, a Falcon 9 booster landing at a new accident investigation would investigate being a extremely unpleasant complication. Even with a single Merlin 1D engine shooting under a Falcon 9’s landing firing, the engine exhaust manifold departs for about 2.7 km / s and can easily send Crew Dragon remnants hundreds or even thousands of meters away and burn less debris. Considering that Crew Dragon’s explosion seems to have been very energetic, many, many of them will already spread many hundreds – and perhaps thousands – of feet around the event.

Crew Dragon is an extremely complex spacecraft. Even the smallest fragments may be critical for the explosion investigation, especially if the fault started somewhere in capsule C201s hundreds of meters of tubing. Pipes, valves and pumps that make up the Crew Dragon’s propellant drive have many hundreds (if not thousands) of small parts that must work without problems to pressurize and handle the spacecraft’s hypergolic propellants.

Below are detailed views on SpaceX’s DM-2 Crew Dragon capsule and its complex pipe system. (Pauline Acalin – August 2018)

Cargo Dragon set to launch

Despite Crew Dragon’s serious failure and the need to change the last-minute recovery recovery program Falcon 9, SpaceX still seems to work to maintain the planned launch date . The instant window is set for 4:22 AM ET (08:22 UTC) on April 30, delayed five days from the original April 25 target. Based on an update provided by NASA last week, these delays are the result of the International Space Station (ISS) scheduling and additional time needed for utility preparation. Orbital-ATK’s (now “Northrop Grumman Innovation Systems” or NGIS) uncrowned Cygnus spacecraft successfully succeeded with the ISS on April 19, followed by the station’s astronauts who unloaded the three-tonne freight it contained in the next few days.

Once the Cygnus operations have been completed, ISS astronauts will be able to begin preparing for Cargo Dragons CRS-17 mission assignment, which will likely have an additional three or four metricons pressures. Although the logistics for unloading, unpacking and storing the contents of hundreds of packages of consumables, hardware, tools, science experiments and more are not exactly exciting, the reality is that the task takes a surprising amount of time and care. Of the maximum six astronauts aboard the ISS at any given time, only a few can focus only on the load logistics while time-sensitive scientific experiments must be put in place immediately to avoid destroying the data produced. In addition, although the ISS is really massive, there are only a handful of boat and docking ports and the actual habitable volume can be cramped, as well as the ports between the station and visiting spacecraft.

An unknown Falcon 9 booster – maybe B1056 – will perform a routine static fire test at SpaceX Launch Complex 40 (LC-40) five or so days before launch, likely within the next 48 hours. Soon after, Falcon 9 will be paired with the CRS-17’s airborne Cargo Dragon capsule and used trunk before rolling back to the LC-40. If the FCC works fast and grants SpaceX’s updated booster recovery license in the next few days, the CRS-17 should be on track for a April 30 launch.

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