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Small “half clock” wearing the leg can convert recovery from stroke

P patients recovering from a stroke may slash their risk of blood clots by wearing a small "wristwatch" around the leg. One study has shown. A study at Royal Stoke University Hospital found the condo to reduce the risk of blood clots compared to standard treatment, is comfortable to wear and can save NHS cash. Approved for use on the NHS under other conditions, cow is a battery-powered, disposable device designed to increase blood flow in the deep veins of the legs. The measure corresponds to about 60 percent walking &#821 1; even if the patient does not have to move. Dr. Indira Natarajan, a physician and clinical advisor for neuroscience at the Royal Stoke University Hospital, conducted a hospital study to determine whether the device could work for stroke patients. He said it was especially useful for those who cannot tolerate intermittent pneumatic compression (IPC) – the standard treatment recommended to prevent blood clots. His study of 219 patients equipped with the bowel found no evidence of blood clots within three months of discharge, compared to 11 cases of blood clots in 463 people prescribed IPC. Dr Natarajan said: "When patients are allowed for stroke, one of the most important complications is the formation of blood clots in the legs. " These blood clots can sometimes move from the legs to the lung and cause pulmonary embolism that can be fatal "About 30 percent of patients cannot go on an IPC pump, putting pressure on the calf muscles." "They…

P patients recovering from a stroke may slash their risk of blood clots by wearing a small “wristwatch” around the leg. One study has shown.

A study at Royal Stoke University Hospital found the condo to reduce the risk of blood clots compared to standard treatment, is comfortable to wear and can save NHS cash.

Approved for use on the NHS under other conditions, cow is a battery-powered, disposable device designed to increase blood flow in the deep veins of the legs.

The measure corresponds to about 60 percent walking &#821

1; even if the patient does not have to move.

Dr. Indira Natarajan, a physician and clinical advisor for neuroscience at the Royal Stoke University Hospital, conducted a hospital study to determine whether the device could work for stroke patients.

He said it was especially useful for those who cannot tolerate intermittent pneumatic compression (IPC) – the standard treatment recommended to prevent blood clots.

His study of 219 patients equipped with the bowel found no evidence of blood clots within three months of discharge, compared to 11 cases of blood clots in 463 people prescribed IPC.

Dr Natarajan said: “When patients are allowed for stroke, one of the most important complications is the formation of blood clots in the legs.

” These blood clots can sometimes move from the legs to the lung and cause pulmonary embolism that can be fatal

“About 30 percent of patients cannot go on an IPC pump, putting pressure on the calf muscles.”

“They cannot use this standard treatment for various reasons, such as having leg ulcers, broken skin or fluid in the leg.” Many people also think that a sleeve that pumps the pressure down the bone means they cannot sleep.

“The drive gets around these problems. It’s like a half wrist watch that fits around the outside of the knee joint.”

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