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Selfie from 20,000 miles away: Israeli Beresheet snaps first space shot – Israel News

Share on facebook Share on twitter The Israeli spacecraft Beresheet takes a selfie 37,600 km from Earth ..                 (photo credit: SPACEIL IAI)             X        Dear Reader,                As you can imagine, more people are reading The Jerusalem Post than ever before.            Nevertheless, traditional business models are no longer sustainable and high-quality publications,            Like ours, we are forced to look for new ways to keep going. Unlike many other news organizations,            we have not put up on paywall. We want to keep our journalism open            and accessible and able to keep providing you with news            and analysis from the frontlines of Israel, the Middle East and the Jewish World.     As one of our loyal readers, we ask you to be our partner. For $ 5 a month you will receive access to the following: A user experience almost completely free of ads Access to our Premium Section Content from the award-winning Jerusalem Report and our monthly magazine to learn Hebrew – Ivrit A brand new ePaper featuring the daily newspaper as it appears in a print in Israel Help us grow and continue counting Israel's story to the world. Thank you,         Ronit Hasin-Hochman, CEO, Jerusalem Post Group        Yaakov Katz, Editor-in-Chief UPGRADE YOUR JPOST EXPERIENCE FOR $ 5 PER MONTH      Show me later The Israeli spacecraft Beresheet, which was launched off the coast of Cape Canaveral, Florida, two weeks ago on its way to a planned Moon landing next month, took its first selfie in space. The selfie – which was taken some 37,600 km (20,000 miles) away from Earth – shows the…


 The Israeli spacecraft beresheet takes a selfie 37,600 km from Earth.

The Israeli spacecraft Beresheet takes a selfie 37,600 km from Earth ..
(photo credit: SPACEIL IAI)

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Dear Reader,

As you can imagine, more people are reading The Jerusalem Post than ever before.
Nevertheless, traditional business models are no longer sustainable and high-quality publications,
Like ours, we are forced to look for new ways to keep going. Unlike many other news organizations,
we have not put up on paywall. We want to keep our journalism open
and accessible and able to keep providing you with news
and analysis from the frontlines of Israel, the Middle East and the Jewish World.

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Ronit Hasin-Hochman, CEO, Jerusalem Post Group
Yaakov Katz, Editor-in-Chief

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Show me later

The Israeli spacecraft Beresheet, which was launched off the coast of Cape Canaveral, Florida, two weeks ago on its way to a planned Moon landing next month, took its first selfie in space. The selfie – which was taken some 37,600 km (20,000 miles) away from Earth – shows the Southern Hemisphere, and Australia can be clearly seen in the background.

The image was taken as the spacecraft slowly orbits the Earth for the next month or so, before it will be pulled by the gravitational force of the Moon and the landing process will begin. Beresheet is scheduled to land on the Moon on April 11.

In the image, a plaque that was installed at the front of the spacecraft is seen, featuring the Israeli flag and the message “Am Yisrael Chai” (lit. Long live the Nation of Israel). An additional inscription also reads “Small country big dreams,” a reference to the founder of modern Zionism Theodore Herzl who was noted for his famous quote, “If you want it, it’s no dream.”

“The selfie of spacecraft is proof of the technological power of Israel,” said the Israeli Minister of Science and Technology. “The spacecraft is proof of the technological strength and power of Israel, and its success lies in an educational message as well as in the children of Israel: You need to dream big , “he said.

” I am proud of the decision of the Science and Technology Ministry to be a partner in this project, “Akunis said.

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