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Salmonella resistant to various antibiotics: Study

Salmonella, a common bacterium that causes food borne diseases, is resistant to several antibiotics used to treat infections, suggesting new…

Salmonella, a common bacterium that causes food borne diseases, is resistant to several antibiotics used to treat infections, suggesting new research.

For the study, the genes were sequenced and examined by 90 strains of a specific serological variant (serovar) of Salmonella enterica known as S. Typhimurium.

When the effects of antibiotics in each of the 90 strains were tested, it was discovered that the vast majority were resistant to different classes of antibiotics included in the arsenal of medicine.

The study, published in the newspaper PLOS ONE, also identified 39 genes responsible for antibiotic resistance.

β€œIt is striking that S. Typhimurium is resistant to antibiotics that can be used to treat the disease. These drugs are available to doctors to fight infected resistance,” said Amanda Aparecida Seribelli of the University of Sao Paulo, Brazil.

Salmonella consists of two species, S. bongori and S. enterica. The latter is the type layer, with a large number of subspecies and serovars that cause more foodborne infections than any other species in Brazil and the world.

The human and animal intestinal tract is the main nature reserve for this pathogen, with poultry, pork and related food products serving as important transmission vectors.

The six subspecies S. enterica are divided into 2 600 serovars.

The most important subspecies of S. enterica from an epidemiological point of view are S. enterica subspecies enterica, which causes the food-borne infection called salmonellosis. Symptoms include diarrhea, fever, stomach cramps and vomiting.

The most common serovas of this subspecies are S. Typhimurium and S. Enteritidis.

All 90 strains analyzed in the study belonged to S. Typhimurium. 1

9659002] The entire genome sequence of the main bacteria that caused acute diarrhea was the focus of research.

According to the study, 65 of the strains showed resistance to sulfonamides, 44 to streptomycin, 27 to tetracycline, 21 to gentamicin and seven to ceftriaxone, a cephalosporin antibiotic.

– IANS

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! (This story has not been edited by Business Standard staff and is automatically generated from a syndicated feed.)

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