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Romaine update: E. coli eruption narrowed to 6 California counties, says the FDA

Romaine harvested outside these six California regions are not related to the current outbreak, according to the FDA, which works…

Romaine harvested outside these six California regions are not related to the current outbreak, according to the FDA, which works with the US Center for Disease Control and Prevention, as well as government and local bodies in its investigation.

Based on this information, CDC has reduced its warning to consumers: Romaine salad harvested from the six California counties should not be eaten. If you do not know where your romaine is grown, do not eat it.

Roman lettuce entering the market will be labeled with either a harvesting site and date or hydroponic or greenhouse information according to the FDA. If your romaine does not have this information, you should not eat it, says the agency.

Three thirds have been infected with the eruption strain, including 16 who have been hospitalized in 12 states since October according to the FDA. People have become ill in California, Connecticut, Illinois, Massachusetts, Maryland, Michigan, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Ohio, Rhode Island and Wisconsin.

At least one of the hospitalized people developed hemolytic uremic syndrome, a potentially life-threatening form of renal failure. No deaths have been reported.

 E. Coli Outbreak Quick Facts

Symptoms of an E. coli infection, usually starting about three or four days after the consumption of the bacteria, may include watery or bloody diarrhea, fever, stomach cramps, nausea and vomiting, according to CDC. Most bacteria infected by bacteria get better within five to seven days, but this strain of E. coli tends to cause more serious disease.

The outbreak is not related to another multitude outbreak in the context of Romaine lettuce this summer. [19659012] The Canadian Public Health Agency and the Canadian Food Inspectorate investigate a similar outbreak and coordinate with the US public health authorities. Twenty-two people have been infected with E. coli diseases in Ontario, Quebec and New Brunswick. Canadian health authorities reported on November 23. Eight people, including one with hemolytic uremic syndrome, have been hospitalized. No deaths have been reported.

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