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Researchers studying cocoa have discovered a “household event” of chocolate trees 3 600 years ago

After researchers studied cultured cocoa trees, they discovered that they were the result of a single domestication event that took place 3,600 years ago. The latest research on these trees is just part of a major debate about when people first began to cultivate chocolate. Like Phys.org has reported Omar Cornejo, a genetician from Washington State University and also leading author of the new study on Cocoa Tree, explaining that there were many questions researchers had in their research on the chocolate source and when it first domesticated. "This proof increases our understanding of how people moved and established cocoa in America. It's important in itself because it gives us a time frame to ask questions that may be harder: how long did it take to make one good cocoa? How strong was the process of domestication? How many plants were necessary to tame a tree? " Eighteen researchers acclaimed from 1 1 institutions participated in the latest study and discovered that cocoa was chosen for many different attributes, including disease resistance, taste and theobromine, which is a stimulant. However, choosing the right attributes meant that crops had a much lower yield, but people could retain the specific genes they wanted. Researchers participating in the new research analyzed Criollo, called the "Prince of Coconuts" and which was also the first source of chocolate to have been tamed 3,600 years ago in Central America. However, Criollo originally came from the Amazon basin, which is very close to what is now the…

After researchers studied cultured cocoa trees, they discovered that they were the result of a single domestication event that took place 3,600 years ago. The latest research on these trees is just part of a major debate about when people first began to cultivate chocolate.

Like Phys.org has reported Omar Cornejo, a genetician from Washington State University and also leading author of the new study on Cocoa Tree, explaining that there were many questions researchers had in their research on the chocolate source and when it first domesticated.

“This proof increases our understanding of how people moved and established cocoa in America. It’s important in itself because it gives us a time frame to ask questions that may be harder: how long did it take to make one good cocoa? How strong was the process of domestication? How many plants were necessary to tame a tree? “

Eighteen researchers acclaimed from 1

1 institutions participated in the latest study and discovered that cocoa was chosen for many different attributes, including disease resistance, taste and theobromine, which is a stimulant. However, choosing the right attributes meant that crops had a much lower yield, but people could retain the specific genes they wanted.

Researchers participating in the new research analyzed Criollo, called the “Prince of Coconuts” and which was also the first source of chocolate to have been tamed 3,600 years ago in Central America. However, Criollo originally came from the Amazon basin, which is very close to what is now the borders of northern Ecuador and southern Colombia, and Cornejo believes that it is most likely to have been taken by merchants to Central America.

It has been accused 3,600 years ago, Criollo cocoa trees had numbered between 437 and 2 674, and domestication extends technically back to between 2 481 and 10 903 years ago. This is scientific sound because small amounts of theobromine have been discovered in both old and modern human DNA as well as Olmec ceramics.

Cornejo noted that researchers are now very interested in trying to take Criollo cocoa and see if they can be combined with other cocoa species, such as Iquitos.

“What we would like is a way to combine plants from high productivity populations, such as Iquitos-with plants of Criollo origin, while retaining all these desirable characteristics that make Criollo cocoa be the best in the world.”

The new study discussing the first domestication of cocoa trees and the chocolate source has been published in Communications Biology .

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