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Researchers study fossil evidence of haj hunting flying dinosaurs in the air

December 19, 2018 Science 0 Views Dinosaur researchers have discovered fossil evidence that at least one shark in the age of the chalk has taken food &#821 1; a flying reptile – in midair. This reconstructed image shows the large Cretoxyrhina mantelli shark biting a Pteranodon's throat. Dinosaur researchers have found fossil evidence that at least one shark in the wartime caught their food – a flying reptile – in midair. The fossil held at the Los Angeles County Natural History Museum shows a tooth from a large Cretoxyrhina mantelli shark embedded between the needle swirls of a Pteranodon, a flying reptile that lived from Triassic to Cretaceous. The fossil was excavated in the 1960s but had not been studied until recently. Researchers were fascinated by the teeth, as it is the "first documented occurrence of this great shark that interacts with any pterosaur."(Stephanie Abramowicz and David Hone, with the permission of the Dinosaur Institute, Natural History Museum in Los Angeles County) The University of Southern California researchers who observed the bones published their findings on Friday in peer-reviewed journal PeerJ. [19659008] The review explained that although interactions between flygtreptile and other fish, including sharks, have been recorded earlier, "until then, the interactions between Cretoxyrhina and Pteranodon have been modest." & # 39; TREASURE TRY & # 39; OF DINOSAUR FOOTPRINTS UNCOVERED IN STRONG STORMAR "Are there sharks today chasing seabirds? Yes, there are," Michael Habib, co-author of the study, told Phys.org. "Is it unique, or have big sharks been…

Dinosaur researchers have found fossil evidence that at least one shark in the wartime caught their food – a flying reptile – in midair.

The fossil held at the Los Angeles County Natural History Museum shows a tooth from a large Cretoxyrhina mantelli shark embedded between the needle swirls of a Pteranodon, a flying reptile that lived from Triassic to Cretaceous.

The fossil was excavated in the 1960s but had not been studied until recently. Researchers were fascinated by the teeth, as it is the “first documented occurrence of this great shark that interacts with any pterosaur.”
(Stephanie Abramowicz and David Hone, with the permission of the Dinosaur Institute, Natural History Museum in Los Angeles County)

The University of Southern California researchers who observed the bones published their findings on Friday in peer-reviewed journal PeerJ. [19659008] The review explained that although interactions between flygtreptile and other fish, including sharks, have been recorded earlier, “until then, the interactions between Cretoxyrhina and Pteranodon have been modest.”

& # 39; TREASURE TRY & # 39; OF DINOSAUR FOOTPRINTS UNCOVERED IN STRONG STORMAR

“Are there sharks today chasing seabirds? Yes, there are,” Michael Habib, co-author of the study, told Phys.org. “Is it unique, or have big sharks been looking for flying creatures for millions of years? The answer is yes they have. We now know that sharks chased flying animals a long time ago as 80 million years.”

The fossil was excavated in the 1960s but had not been studied until recently. Scientists were fascinated by the teeth, as it is the first documented occurrence of this great shark that interacts with some pterosaur.

Two views on Cretoxyrhina mantelli tooth with track.
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