Categories: world

Researchers discover rare fossils from Big Bang

NASA, ESA, STScI and G. Piotto (Università degli Studi di Padova) and E. Noyola (Max Planck Institute of Extraterrestrial Physics)The first stars of the universe are far away, but their signatures can still be written over space buried in gas clouds like space dolphins. And scientists believe they have discovered one. Researchers at Swinburne University In Melbourne, Australia used its time at the WM Keck Observatory, home to two of the world's most powerful telescopes, to go on an astro-archeological digging through space. They discovered a "untouched cloud of gas" in the distant universe, which appears to be untouched by heavy elements, suggesting that it may be a "fossil relic" of the storängen. Space fossils How do you find a fossil relic in space? Well, the universe has had a lot of birthdays &#821 1; it's about 13.7 billion years old. During that time, many stars have lived and died. At the end of a star's life, it may sometimes explode, become a supernova. This massive explosion spills out a lot of waste of heavy substances (metals), so when scientists look into space, they often find gas clouds shining with this material. For 13.7 billion years, many stars have exploded – so there's a lot of waste in the clouds. By investigating these clouds of clouds, researchers allow for insight into some of the earliest events in the universe. If gas clouds are untouched by the waste, they may have been in the infant universe. The research team believes that…

 m75-0
NASA, ESA, STScI and G. Piotto (Università degli Studi di Padova) and E. Noyola (Max Planck Institute of Extraterrestrial Physics)

The first stars of the universe are far away, but their signatures can still be written over space buried in gas clouds like space dolphins.

And scientists believe they have discovered one.

Researchers at Swinburne University In Melbourne, Australia used its time at the WM Keck Observatory, home to two of the world’s most powerful telescopes, to go on an astro-archeological digging through space. They discovered a “untouched cloud of gas” in the distant universe, which appears to be untouched by heavy elements, suggesting that it may be a “fossil relic” of the storängen.

Space fossils

How do you find a fossil relic in space?

Well, the universe has had a lot of birthdays &#821

1; it’s about 13.7 billion years old. During that time, many stars have lived and died. At the end of a star’s life, it may sometimes explode, become a supernova. This massive explosion spills out a lot of waste of heavy substances (metals), so when scientists look into space, they often find gas clouds shining with this material. For 13.7 billion years, many stars have exploded – so there’s a lot of waste in the clouds.

By investigating these clouds of clouds, researchers allow for insight into some of the earliest events in the universe. If gas clouds are untouched by the waste, they may have been in the infant universe.

The research team believes that they have identified one that is virtually untouched by heavy waste.

“Our inspiration is actually finding relics of the first stars of the universe,” said Professor Michael Murphy, one of the leading researchers in the study. Gas clouds that relate to the first stars would be “almost untouched,” according to Murphy, so there would still be traces of the heavy element waste in them.

But the fossil relics they found had no detectable levels of waste – “It was absolutely pure – indicating that it is from the very early universe and has been unspoilt for 1.5 billion years after the storm.

“This discovery – a seemingly untouched cloud – is really important,” says Murphy. “We need to know if such clouds can be billions of years without being polluted by several generations of stars.”

Before this discovery only two such cloud clouds had been discovered – and these discoveries were usually unintentional. By actively exploring cloud clouds and showing that they are untouched by heavy elements, Murphy’s team has shown that it is possible to dig for them.

“Now we have proven that we can systematically find such fossils, we really have a chance to know how rare or common they are,” Murphy says. “It’s crucial to test our understanding of how the first galaxies were formed.”

The first stars

This is not the first time these greyhound clouds have proved fruitful for Swinburne researchers. In 2016, the team discovered an “almost untouched” cloud of clouds with data from the great telescope in Chile.

“It turned out that I’m trying to chase after these clouds – and the untouched clouds like the one we have now discovered – was measurably possible and could basically identify a” smoking service “drawing of the first stars,” Murphy says.

However, there may be alternative explanations for why gas clouds are so clean – and these explanations are also exciting.

One possibility is that the cloud is polluted by one of the first stars of the universe, leaving only traces of heavy elements, undetectable by the telescopes that the team used. Another is that gas clouds move for the first time through a galaxy, so it has not yet been polluted by other stars yet.

“This is an exciting opportunity to understand how such gas clouds feed galaxies is a major problem in astrophysics,” explains Murphy.

“We would like to test this opportunity by mapping a few galaxies near the cloud in the future.”

And so the earliest signatures as written over the cosmos continue. 19659008] CNETs Holiday Gift Guide: The Place to Find the Best Technical Gifts for 2018.

NASA becomes 60: Space Agency has taken humanity beyond anyone else, and it plans to move on.

Share
Published by
Faela