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Rarely seen “headless chicken monster” – actually a sea cucumber – saw in the southern ocean

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Expanding camera technology has made it possible for us to capture more and more with every technical development. Now new camera technology developed by Australian scientists shines light on the deeper parts of the ocean and exactly what lives in the dark.

A creature whose name is translated to “headless chicken monster” is the latest observation of rare Antarctica creatures in southern seawater.

The headless chicken monster, whose scientific name is Enypniastes eximia is a kind of deep-sea cucumber with the ability to swim due to its wing-shaped fins.

Sea gorges are poopards, a refill of invertebrate marine animals that contain starfish and sea drills. They are generally seabed and fed to small particles like algae. There are approximately 1

250 known species, some of which are harvested illegally, as they are worthy of delicacies and folk medicine.

The headless chicken monster has only seen once in the Gulf of Mexico, according to the Australian Department of Energy and Conservation. This time the creature was played under a project using cameras to understand the effects of long-term fishing on species living in deeper parts of the ocean.

“The cameras provide important information about areas of the seabed that can handle this kind of fishing and sensitive areas to be avoided,” said Dr. Dirk Welsford, Program Director of the Australian Antarctic Department.

In the video captured by Australian researchers can the transparent red monster be seen as a birth to sea floor with different tentacles, as if walking for a walk. It can also be seen as fainting up with its fins, as most sea earphones can not do.

“Some of the pictures We return from the cameras are amazing, including species we have never seen in this part of the world, Sade Welsford.

He evolved into the special camera and said, “We needed something that could be thrown from a boat and would continue to operate reliably under extreme pressure in tanks for long periods of time.”

Data collected from the cameras was presented on Monday at an annual meeting of the Commission for the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources in Hobart, Australia.

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