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Prosecutor in Chicago to release charges against former US principal Aaron Schock if he pays back the IRS campaign

In a surprise for a high-profile public corruption case, federal prosecutors in Chicago have agreed to release all allegations against former US republic Aaron Schock if he pays back money he owes to the Internal Revenue Service and his campaign fund. The amazing deal, known as a postponed prosecution, was announced on Wednesday during what would be a routine state interrogation for Schock before the US district director Matthew Kennelly. According to the agreement, Schock, 37, has to pay $ 42,000 to the IRS and $ 68,000 to his congressional campaign fund. If he does – and stays with some new problem – the prosecutors would release all the crimes against Schock and leave him a clean record. As part of the deal, Schock's campaign committee, Schock for congress, pleaded guilty to a misdemeanor on Wednesday to expect to fail to properly account for expenses. Kennelly approved the prosecution after the prosecutors had said they had taken a fresh look at the charges and decided that this would be a "fair and fair" result, especially given that Schock has no criminal registered and resigned from public office . In a statement, the Schock applauded the prosecutor's decision but questioned why it took so long. "But I continue to ask where was the monitoring and monitoring when my accusation began?" he said . "It shouldn't have taken four years, two US law firms, three judges, and millions of dollars in taxpayer and myself costs to come to this conclusion." "I have…

In a surprise for a high-profile public corruption case, federal prosecutors in Chicago have agreed to release all allegations against former US republic Aaron Schock if he pays back money he owes to the Internal Revenue Service and his campaign fund.

The amazing deal, known as a postponed prosecution, was announced on Wednesday during what would be a routine state interrogation for Schock before the US district director Matthew Kennelly.

According to the agreement, Schock, 37, has to pay $ 42,000 to the IRS and $ 68,000 to his congressional campaign fund. If he does – and stays with some new problem – the prosecutors would release all the crimes against Schock and leave him a clean record.

As part of the deal, Schock’s campaign committee, Schock for congress, pleaded guilty to a misdemeanor on Wednesday to expect to fail to properly account for expenses.

Kennelly approved the prosecution after the prosecutors had said they had taken a fresh look at the charges and decided that this would be a “fair and fair” result, especially given that Schock has no criminal registered and resigned from public office .

In a statement, the Schock applauded the prosecutor’s decision but questioned why it took so long.

“But I continue to ask where was the monitoring and monitoring when my accusation began?” he said . “It shouldn’t have taken four years, two US law firms, three judges, and millions of dollars in taxpayer and myself costs to come to this conclusion.”

“I have consistently and consistently said that mistakes were made in the management of my campaign and congressional office, and I have recognized responsibility for it &#821

1; but mistakes are not a crime.”

Schock, who was once considered a rising star in Republican Party, resigned in 2015 in connection with the federal investigation of his use of his campaign funds and housing allowance to pay staff costs ranging from an extravagant rebuilding of his Washington office inspired by the British television series “Downton Abbey” to fly on a private plane. to participate in a Chicago Bears game.

Schock was charged in a 24-figure charge in November 2016 with wire scams, mail fraud, state funds theft, making false claims, filing false reports with federal election officials, and filing fake tax refunds. A judge later dismissed two of these bills.

The former congressman had planned to attempt June 10 in Chicago’s federal court. The case had been handed over to Kennelly in August in August from the Urbana court after the judge was accused of wrong behavior in an undeniable case.

The postponed prosecution may mean that Schock’s once promising political career is not necessarily over because he avoids a prison conviction.

He first entered the public life of 19 when he won a submission campaign selected for the Peoria School. He was elected to Congress in 2009 at the age of 27 and was hailed as the first house member born in the 1980s. He was seen as a sweetheart of the Republican Party and had taken on important political collection roles at the time of his resignation.

The bombshell development in Schock’s case comes weeks after the US Supreme Court abstained from bringing proceedings. His lawyers had unsuccessfully tried to get the prosecution thrown out and said the charges were based on ambiguous house rules contrary to clauses on separation clauses in the Constitution.

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