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Prehistoric shark size of a big white jumped out of water to take down an eighteen foot pterosaur

Researchers have revealed surprising evidence of a terrific space between a shark and a pterosaur. USC researchers who studied leg at the LA County Natural History Museum were shocked to find a fossil from the horrific aviation reptile that had a shark landing. They think the fox is the result of a terrible shark of six feet that slowly jump in the air to try to take down the much larger pterosaur with a 18-foot wing tip. Scroll down from video USC researchers believe the fin is the result of a terrible shark six meters tall and jumps into the air to try to take down the much larger pterosaur with a 18-foot wing tip. The image, the artist's impression of the battle FLYING VICTIM Pteranodon was the master of the sky. The giant flight reptiles were superfluous when the dinosaurs went on the ground. Pteranodon sported an eye-catching crested skull, had a wing tip at 18 feet and weighed about 100 pounds. They could travel long stretches, land and take off water and had a fancy for fish. The sad outcome of a special aviation reptile is played brutally on a fossil where a shark crushed its neck and left an igniting tooth crossed against a vertebra. Researchers found that the tooth was stuck between the backs of the vertebrae, which was clear evidence of a bit. It is possible that the attack occurred when Pteranodon was most exposed, sprawled on top of the water, says Michael Habib, Assistant…

Researchers have revealed surprising evidence of a terrific space between a shark and a pterosaur.

USC researchers who studied leg at the LA County Natural History Museum were shocked to find a fossil from the horrific aviation reptile that had a shark landing.

They think the fox is the result of a terrible shark of six feet that slowly jump in the air to try to take down the much larger pterosaur with a 18-foot wing tip.

Scroll down from video

 USC scientists believe the wind is the result of a terrible shark six meters long jump in the air to try to take down the much larger pterosaur with a 18-foot wing tip. The image, artist's impression of the battle

USC researchers believe the fin is the result of a terrible shark six meters tall and jumps into the air to try to take down the much larger pterosaur with a 18-foot wing tip. The image, the artist’s impression of the battle

FLYING VICTIM

Pteranodon was the master of the sky.

The giant flight reptiles were superfluous when the dinosaurs went on the ground. Pteranodon sported an eye-catching crested skull, had a wing tip at 18 feet and weighed about 100 pounds.

They could travel long stretches, land and take off water and had a fancy for fish.

The sad outcome of a special aviation reptile is played brutally on a fossil where a shark crushed its neck and left an igniting tooth crossed against a vertebra.

Researchers found that the tooth was stuck between the backs of the vertebrae, which was clear evidence of a bit.

It is possible that the attack occurred when Pteranodon was most exposed, sprawled on top of the water, says Michael Habib, Assistant Professor of Integrative Anatomy Sciences at Keck School of Medicine of USC and a Research Assistant at the Natural History Museum [19659008] While Pteranodon could land and take off water, they were innocent at sea and took a long time to take off.

“We know that big sharks ate the pterosaurs, so we can say that a large fast predator would have eaten this Pteranodon much when it came into the water, but we will never know exactly,” Habib said.

The tooth belonged to Cretoxyrhina mantelli, a common shark.

It was big, fast and powerful, about 8 feet long and roughly comparable in appearance and behavior to today’s big white shark, but it’s not closely related.

 Evidence of the Cretoxyrhina Mantelli Warfare Feeding the Pterosaur Pteranodon from the Niobar Formation

Evidence of the War Cretacean Mantelli Warfare Feeds on the Pterosaur Pterosaurus from the Niobara Reformation

This is the first documented occurrence of this shark species that interacts with a pterosaur, found the study.

Understanding the ecology of these animals is important in understanding the world’s life over time, says the study’s leading author.

“Are there sharks today who chase seabirds? Yes, there is. Is it unique or have big sharks been looking for flying creatures for millions of years? The answer is yes they have.

” We now know that sharks chased on flying animals a long time ago as 80 million years. “

The study is shown in the 14th edition of the Peer J Journal of Life and Environmental Sciences. The result of a certain flying reptile is played brutally on a fossil where a shark trampled its neck and ” class=”blkBorder img-share” />

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