Categories: world

Plagued by porch pirates? This NASA engineer put a glitter-bomb trap

Revenge can be cute. And as a new video shows, it can also be sparkling and smelly. While millions of Americans handle this high season with frustrating mushrooms of so-called porch pirates – thieves that break out of doors – a YouTube star decided to do something about it. Mark Rober, a NASA engineer and a YouTube personality with over 4 million followers known for their elaborate science experiments and homemade gadgets, published an incredibly innovative new video Monday entitled "Package Thief vs. Glitter Bomb Trap" which is good, quite self explanatory. Rober said that he worked six months to develop a device that will not prevent packets from stolen, but would result in the thieves being covered in glitter and spray spray. The video shows Rober who builds the "package", which includes cell phone cameras to watch the thieves' reactions, an apparatus for spraying a pound of glitter when the package is opened and a tracking system to recover after the robber has dumped it. The result is as satisfying as it is technically impressive: [embedded content] The video, as Rober said, "may be my Magnum Opus," exceeded more than 1 million views on YouTube, a device in Alphabet Inc. GOOGL, -2.48% GOOG, -2.45% Google in a few hours monday. Package theft is rarely such a laugh. A report from InsuranceQuotes.com in 2017 found that nearly 26 million Americans reported that they had packaged the chair from their porch or door during their vacation. A separate report from the…

Revenge can be cute. And as a new video shows, it can also be sparkling and smelly.

While millions of Americans handle this high season with frustrating mushrooms of so-called porch pirates – thieves that break out of doors – a YouTube star decided to do something about it.

Mark Rober, a NASA engineer and a YouTube personality with over 4 million followers known for their elaborate science experiments and homemade gadgets, published an incredibly innovative new video Monday entitled “Package Thief vs. Glitter Bomb Trap” which is good, quite self explanatory.

Rober said that he worked six months to develop a device that will not prevent packets from stolen, but would result in the thieves being covered in glitter and spray spray. The video shows Rober who builds the “package”, which includes cell phone cameras to watch the thieves’ reactions, an apparatus for spraying a pound of glitter when the package is opened and a tracking system to recover after the robber has dumped it. The result is as satisfying as it is technically impressive:

The video, as Rober said, “may be my Magnum Opus,” exceeded more than 1 million views on YouTube, a device in Alphabet Inc.

GOOGL, -2.48%

GOOG, -2.45%

Google in a few hours monday.

Package theft is rarely such a laugh. A report from InsuranceQuotes.com in 2017 found that nearly 26 million Americans reported that they had packaged the chair from their porch or door during their vacation. A separate report from the package guard estimates that the average of stolen packages is between 50 and 100 USD. Doing some math, and it would make holiday season losses due to package tariffs of more than $ 1 billion.

It has become such a problem for companies like Amazon.com Inc.

AMZN, -4.46%

seeks high-tech solutions, such as face recognition software for smart door bells that can identify suspects.

Most insurance plans do not cover package theft, and because most of us will not build our own glitter bombs, experts recommend that they need a signature for deliveries, delivery of locking carton, packages delivered to your workplace or the good old piece Method to ask your neighbors if your packages can be released in their house, as long as they are at home.

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Faela