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Physicist wants to use quantum particles to find out what is happening in a black hole

A new method for analyzing the constriction of distorted particles can tell us how the universe still keeps track of information contained in particles that disappear in black holes. It will not get our quantum information back, but it can at least tell us what happened to it. Physicist Beni Yoshida of the Perimeter Institute in Canada and Norman Yao of the University of California, Berkeley, have proposed a way to distinguish distorted quantum information from the noise of meaningless chaos. While the concept promises a lot of potential applications in the emerging area of ​​quantum technology, understanding what is happening in the most paradoxical places of the universe is that it can have its largest payout amount. "This is essentially a qubit or qutrit experiment, but the fact that we can relate it to cosmology is that we believe the dynamics of quantum information is the same," says a colleague of Yoshida, Irfan Siddiqi, who was not directly involved In the study Black holes are where the extremely small meets the extremely large Thanks to their intense, material squeeze pulp concentrations, in black hole research, quantum states become much more important than when we talk about the behavior of planets and stars. A great question that the physicists stumped is what happens to the basic information describing the state of a particle when it crosses a black hole line with no return. Take an electron, for example, it has charge, mass, momentum … a number of properties that make…

A new method for analyzing the constriction of distorted particles can tell us how the universe still keeps track of information contained in particles that disappear in black holes. It will not get our quantum information back, but it can at least tell us what happened to it.

Physicist Beni Yoshida of the Perimeter Institute in Canada and Norman Yao of the University of California, Berkeley, have proposed a way to distinguish distorted quantum information from the noise of meaningless chaos.

While the concept promises a lot of potential applications in the emerging area of ​​quantum technology, understanding what is happening in the most paradoxical places of the universe is that it can have its largest payout amount.

“This is essentially a qubit or qutrit experiment, but the fact that we can relate it to cosmology is that we believe the dynamics of quantum information is the same,” says a colleague of Yoshida, Irfan Siddiqi, who was not directly involved In the study

Black holes are where the extremely small meets the extremely large Thanks to their intense, material squeeze pulp concentrations, in black hole research, quantum states become much more important than when we talk about the behavior of planets and stars.

A great question that the physicists stumped is what happens to the basic information describing the state of a particle when it crosses a black hole line with no return.

Take an electron, for example, it has charge, mass, momentum … a number of properties that make it an electron and not a neutrino or a quark.

There is always angular space for how the electron can change, but the physics is a hell of a record holder, so the information about its different states is always there.

If that electron enters a black hole and becomes stuffy in an impossible little space, disconnected from the universe with a ridiculously steep funnel of space time, it is difficult to say what happens to the information coding its past and present states .

On the one hand, the universe should still keep these account books sharp. On the other hand, our hypothetical electron now stumbles with all other quarks, muon and electron in such a way that it is difficult to tell what is what. Is the original information lost in the noise? Or is it simply repositioned?

There is a glimpse of hope for the universe’s account. But it is not beautiful.

In the 1

970s, a relatively young Stephen Hawking suggested that the fizz pop of quantum noise at the edge of the black hole would see some particle twins separating at birth, with one falling into the black hole and other zippers in freedom.

No one has verified this “hawking radiation” as an actual thing, at least not yet. But this suggests that this record management can simply occur in an unexpected form.

Information coded for how these particle nodes reflect each other – called the constriction – can give a dirt hole. Considering that there is enough associated information in the form of the fugitive particle, the universe can carry its books carefully again.

“You can restore the information released into the black hole by making a massive quantum calculation on these outgoing Hawking photos,” Yao says.

“This is expected to be real, really difficult, but if quantum mechanics is to be believed, it should in principle be possible.”

Keywords are “basically”. For even a black hole, our sun size, the universe would be a cold, empty place long before enough information was released to describe its heart, making it a dubious opportunity at best.

This time frame can be shortened considerably if the information into a black hole mixes quickly enough.

With this in mind, Yoshida and Yao proposed an experimental method based on something called out-of-order correlation functions. These “OTOCs” compare the quantum state of a particle based on the timing of some changes.

The mathematics involved is complicated, but they provide insight into the accounting procedures at work, which shows a potential way to tell if a particle identity is truly inseparable from chaos or just encrypted.

To test their idea, they used a small quantum circuit to distort quantum states. This constituted a handful of particles that had not yet been measured before.

Look at how the information seems to be teleporting between the particles as they are measured, saying a lot about how much of their information was only raised and how much is completely lost in the noise.

“With our protocol, if you measure a teleportation confidence high enough, you can guarantee that encryption occurred in the quantum circuit,” Yao says.

In their test case, they came up with a fidelity of 80 percent, which means that half of the states were encrypted and the other half broken down inextricably.

It is a solid concept for concepts that can lead to new tools for managing the sensitive nature of quantity systems. Not to mention an even more exciting prize – tricks like this one day can tell if the universe keeps track of what’s inside black holes.

This research was published in Physical Review X .

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