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Opera Reborn 3: No modern browser is perfect, but this may be as close as it gets

When Opera Software unveiled a new look and feel for its browser earlier this year, the company made a big deal of the impending changes. "We put Web content at center stage," the Opera team declared on its blog. And early previews of the design appeared to be quite pared down, allowing users to browse "unhindered by unnecessary distractions" as the Opera team put it Because Opera recently released what the company refers to as Reborn 3, the latest version of Its flagship desktop browser, and it is tempting to dismiss the name as little more than marketing hype. But given the relentless and utterly unspectacular updates that the Chromium project releases every six weeks, it can also be hard to denote actual big releases or browsers based on Chromium — the "Reborn" moniker. After spending some time with Reborn 3, however, the name seems accurate. For Opera, this is a significant update goes beyond what came with the move to Chromium 60. Opera Reborn 3 or Opera 60 if you want to stick with version numbers — transitions a slew of features that recently debuted in Opera's mobile browsers to the desktop. The big three in this release are support for blockchain-secured transactions, a crypto wallet to go with the mobile version, and a new overall look with light and dark themes available. So if you haven't checked out Opera lately, it's worth revisiting, especially for those older Opera fans still smarting about the switch from Opera's presto rendering…

When Opera Software unveiled a new look and feel for its browser earlier this year, the company made a big deal of the impending changes. “We put Web content at center stage,” the Opera team declared on its blog. And early previews of the design appeared to be quite pared down, allowing users to browse “unhindered by unnecessary distractions” as the Opera team put it

Because Opera recently released what the company refers to as Reborn 3, the latest version of Its flagship desktop browser, and it is tempting to dismiss the name as little more than marketing hype. But given the relentless and utterly unspectacular updates that the Chromium project releases every six weeks, it can also be hard to denote actual big releases or browsers based on Chromium — the “Reborn” moniker. After spending some time with Reborn 3, however, the name seems accurate. For Opera, this is a significant update goes beyond what came with the move to Chromium 60.

Opera Reborn 3 or Opera 60 if you want to stick with version numbers — transitions a slew of features that recently debuted in Opera’s mobile browsers to the desktop. The big three in this release are support for blockchain-secured transactions, a crypto wallet to go with the mobile version, and a new overall look with light and dark themes available. So if you haven’t checked out Opera lately, it’s worth revisiting, especially for those older Opera fans still smarting about the switch from Opera’s presto rendering engine to Google’s Blink rendering engine.

Opera once filed a complaint with the EU saying that Internet Explorer was holding back the Web “by not following accepted Web standards.” The founders of Opera (who have since moved on to other things) probably never imagined their browser would be one day share a rendering engine with Internet Explorer, but it does now. And it’s true, this is not the Opera of old — there’s no mail client, no IRC support to name a few things — but it does offer much more features than Chrome or Chromium.

That said, Opera’s user base (like every other web browser) next to Google Chrome. But Opera was the originator of many things we all granted for having become part of any Web browser these days. Tabbed browsing, mouse gestures, and the “speed dial” of page thumbnails on new tabs are just a few of the things that started life in Opera. The company’s innovation track record is impressive, and it bears paying attention to what Opera is doing.

Firefox, Chrome, and the rest have been copied all those features listed above, but for quite some time the future of the web browser looked like, you checked in with what Opera was doing. So while Opera may have opted for aspects of the current and vogue playbook by taking a web-centric approach to Reborn 3, what makes this latest release interesting is that does offer quite a few new things that still feel well done with what the rest of the market is doing. If you’ve been thinking of Opera’s innovative mobile browsers like Touch — a browser designed for one-handed use — you might recognize a few additions to Reborn 3. [1

9659008] Enlarge / If you’ve been tinkering with Opera’s innovative mobile browsers like Touch — a browser designed for one-handed use — you might recognize a few additions to Reborn 3.

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