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OPEC, global crude production in focus

Preventing oil prices from rising any further has been a relentless rise in U.S. crude output, which hit a record…

Preventing oil prices from rising any further has been a relentless rise in U.S. crude output, which hit a record 11.6 million bpd in the week ending Nov. 2, according to Energy Information Administration (EIA) data released on Wednesday.

That’s a threefold increase from the U.S. low reached a decade ago, and a 22.2 percent rise just this year. It makes the United States the world’s largest producer of crude oil.

More U.S. oil will likely come. The EIA expects output to break through 12 million bpd by mid-2019, thanks largely to a surge in shale oil production.

Meanwhile, U.S. Crude inventory rose at 5.8 million barrels in the week ending Nov. 2, two 431

.79 million barrels, the EIA said.

Crude stocks moved back above their five-year average levels in October.

Production has not just risen in the United States, but also in many other countries, including Russia, Saudi Arabia, Iraq and Brazil, stoking producer concerns of a return of oversupply that depressed oil prices between 2014 and 2017.

“Producers are concerned about the potential oversupply … after EIA reported that crude inventories rose by 5.8 million barrels,” said Stephen Innes, head of trading for Asia Pacific, at Oanda futures brokerage in Singapore.

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