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Octavia Spencer roots a Formula Flick in something unpleasant – Variety

Like Titan's character of "Ma", Octavia Spencer goes to the role of a friendly-on-the-outside, crazy-on-in-desperate stalker pest in a way that suits a world-class actress who has chosen to star in a pumpkin B movie. She does everything she can to play the character as a real person, and it achieves two things: It puts some meat on the clear / stupid legs in this Blumhouse production – a teen-girl variation on the "Fatal Attraction" with distant glimmers of "Carrie" like "Misery" and other revenge-of-the-nerd stalker thrillers. At the same time, Spencer makes humanity just the character that much nicer, which is good. You can't take "Ma" seriously. It is a complex formula image that is too busy connecting dots, striking beats, technical situations designed to make you feel ashamed. But you will suffocate. And even though the youngest sector of the demo for this movie will know that they are being manipulated, they will likely show up for it. The news and, I dare say, the block of Spencer's performance &#821 1; when she doesn't pull out all the stops, even though she manages to do it in a controlled way – would prove to be enough to attract "Ma" to a small money maker. Related In an anonymous gray working class scrub-brush town that looks like it could be in the middle of Ohio or Missouri or Massachusetts or Nevada, and really benefits from never Be named, Maggie (Diana Silvers), who has just moved there with her mother,…

Like Titan’s character of “Ma”, Octavia Spencer goes to the role of a friendly-on-the-outside, crazy-on-in-desperate stalker pest in a way that suits a world-class actress who has chosen to star in a pumpkin B movie. She does everything she can to play the character as a real person, and it achieves two things: It puts some meat on the clear / stupid legs in this Blumhouse production – a teen-girl variation on the “Fatal Attraction” with distant glimmers of “Carrie” like “Misery” and other revenge-of-the-nerd stalker thrillers. At the same time, Spencer makes humanity just the character that much nicer, which is good.

You can’t take “Ma” seriously. It is a complex formula image that is too busy connecting dots, striking beats, technical situations designed to make you feel ashamed. But you will suffocate. And even though the youngest sector of the demo for this movie will know that they are being manipulated, they will likely show up for it. The news and, I dare say, the block of Spencer’s performance &#821

1; when she doesn’t pull out all the stops, even though she manages to do it in a controlled way – would prove to be enough to attract “Ma” to a small money maker.

In an anonymous gray working class scrub-brush town that looks like it could be in the middle of Ohio or Missouri or Massachusetts or Nevada, and really benefits from never Be named, Maggie (Diana Silvers), who has just moved there with her mother, Erica (Juliette Lewis), finds herself hanging out with a lot of new high schools in a cabinet outside a liquor store. They continue to try, and fail, to get an adult to buy them some spirits. Then comes Sue Ann (Spencer) along with a three-legged dog. She also balks, but remembers her own days hanging out on the mountaintops, a local teenage pottery who has all the pleasure of a dump. so she buys the kids some bottles. The next day she buys them a few more. Then she invites them to her house to party in the basement.

Sue Ann, who works as an assistant to a test veterinarian (Allison Janney), seems to be a lone person, but it is not as if it is hosting host parties in the unfinished room in her large home in the middle of nowhere could is called responsible behavior. Something is gone, and flashbacks to Sue Ann’s 80s, when she was a wall flower (Kyanna Simone Simpson), who continued to be contacted by Ben (Matthew Welch), the hottest guy in school, told us that something really bad happened. 19659002] Spencer, a shameleon of an actress, swings mood in “Ma” leaving us entertaining guard. First, she is the good-looking, warm-hearted divorced loser who, after all these years, tries to indulge with the hipster-insider children. Then she is the middle-aged wannabe party lady who still thinks it’s cool to dance the robot to “Funkytown”. Then she is in need of blowing video selfie invitations to all the children’s phones and the hilarious cougar with eyes for Andy (Corey Fogelmanis), the cutest boy in Maggie’s click, who at one point refers to Sue Ann as “ma” and nicknamed sticks. (She becomes the children’s mom’s mascot.) Then she’s the hothead that forces Andy to lose at gunpoint, then the prankster that sounds like it’s all a big joke and says, “You think I’m Madea?”

She is also, of course, the unpleasant manipulator who will spit spirits with the animal’s sedative. And the angry psycho with a thirst of revenge (although Spencer does it with a strange inviting smile). And the mother who is a major problem of Munchausen syndrome through proxy.

“Ma” was directed by Tate Taylor, who did “The Help,” which included a brilliant (and Oscar-winning) performance by Spencer. He then grew as a director in his unfairly overlooked follow-up movie “Get On Up”, a James Brown biopic, with an extraordinary achievement by Chadwick Boseman, that was my choice for best movie in 2014. I think I understand why Taylor has now slumbered. Making a Blumhouse thriller like “Ma” is a way to shore up his commercial bona fides – and he thought he would come loose and have fun. In Jordan Peele, it’s not like he loses credibility.

But when you try to make a good movie from a script such as Scotty Landes, which is made of derivative pieces, you can wind up spinning your wheels. In “Ma” Taylor plays pieces of texture that go in the early teenage scenes and in the interaction between Maggie and her mother, Juliette Lewis played as an outdated tough bird returning to her hometown after trying to do it in San Francisco (where her marriage failed , and her career ambitions too). She has been working as a cocktail waitress at the local casino, leaving her time to supervise her daughter, who is her own, logistical and spiritual.

Diane Silvers has a coltish sincerity, and she and the other actors do what they can to fill in their roles. They play enchanted versions of the fresh meat in a slasher movie, but Taylor shows a gift for snus terror. Sue Ann has a hidden agenda for choosing these kids, and when she finally decides to measure punishment, the film makes you in all the right places. And there is an added sly element. The subject of race is barely mentioned, but when Sue Ann talks about growing up as an “outsider”, Octavia Spencer puts it in with a subtitle of what it meant to be the isolated black girl who tried to fit into a homogenized youth culture of middle American louts. There is no justification for the horror she infects. But there is little explanation for the explanation.

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