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No, a Mars volcano is not currently disappearing

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Clouds over Arsia Mons on October 16. European Space Agency

Some corners of YouTube, Twitter and the rest of the internet warm up over some recent pictures sent back of Mars orbits that appear to show a cloud plum coming from Arsia Mons, a large volcano on the surface of the red planet .

But the science community wants to like you knowing that these clouds are much more icy than smokey and there is definitely not a volcanic eruption that occurs on our nearby planet right now.

These are cloudy clouds over the top of Arsia Mons,” NASA wrote about a picture captured by Mars Odyssey Spacecraft 2001 last month.

Some photos taken last week by the European Space Agency’s Mars Express Orbiter (above) really seem like a smoke plug something we saw when terrestrial satellites pointed to the cameras on the Hawaii Kilauea volcano earlier this year. [19659003] But the reality is that it is been at least 10 million years since the formidable Arsia Mons broke out . It must have been a rather remarkable eruption too, because & nbsp; The volcano is an incredible 270 miles wide and 12 miles high. Mauna Loa, the world’s largest volcano, is only 6.2 miles high and 75 miles above.

It appears that the current marsh clouds are simple water clouds that condense over the volcano and it is a phenomenon seen on Arsia Mons before, as in this more detailed image from 2015:

Mols in Arsia Mons on March 2015. ISRO / ISSDC / Justin Cowart

The pattern has also been documented in peer-reviewed journals at even earlier dates.

The occurrence of lasting turbidity in this area, even during the relatively hot and cloudless season … can indicate unique local circulation processes,” reads an article in 2005 in & nbsp Journal of Geophysical Research: Planets.

The chief author of the 2005 article Planetary Science Institute Dr Eldar Noe Dobrea pointed to his colleagues recently and they all agreed that the clouds were seen now at Arsia Mons is not a product of a volcanic eruption according to Skyweek .

No active volcanoes have been found on Mars, but that does not mean we can rule out the possibility of outbreaks in the future. However, if an outbreak occurred now or sometime soon, it would be evident from changes in the atmospheric chemistry of the planet and so far nothing has been so spectacularly observed yet.

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Clouds over Arsia Mons in October 16. European Space Agency

Some corners of YouTube, Twitter and the rest of the internet warm up over some recent photos sent back by Mars orbits that seem to show a cloudy plum coming from Arsia Mons, a large volcano on the surface of the red planet.

But the science community wants you to know that these clouds are far more oily than smoky and it is definitely not a volcanic eruption that occurs on our nearby planet right now.

These are ice-clear clouds over the top of Arsia Mons,” NASA wrote of an image captured by the Mars Odyssey Spacecraft 2001 last month.

Some pictures taken last week by the European Space Agency’s Mars Express orbiter (above) really looks like a flue gas something we saw when terrestrial satellites pointed to their cameras at the Hawaii Kilauea volcano earlier this year.

But the reality is that d one has been at least 10 million years since the formidable Arsia Mons broke out. It must have been a rather remarkable eruption too, as the volcano is an incredible 270 miles wide and 12 miles high. Mauna Loa, the world’s largest volcano, is only 6.2 miles high and 75 miles above.

It turns out that the current marsh clouds are simple water clouds that condense over the volcano and it is a phenomenon seen on Arsia Mons before, as in this more detailed image from 2015:

Moln in Arsia Mons on March 2015. ISRO / ISSDC / Justin Cowart

The pattern has also been documented in peer-reviewed journals at even earlier dates.

The presence of persistent turbidity in this area, even during the relatively hot and cloudless season … can indicate unique local circulation processes,” reads an article in 2005 in Journal of Geophysical Research: Planets.

The chief author of the 2005 article, Dr. Eldar Noe Dobrea, the planet science institute, recently polished their colleagues and they all agreed that the clouds are now seen at Arsia Mons is not the product of volcanic eruption jon, according to Skyweek.

No active volcanoes have been found on Mars, but that does not mean we can rule out the possibility of outbreaks in the future. If there was an outbreak now or sometime soon, it would be apparent from changes in the planet’s atmospheric chemistry and so far nothing has been so spectacularly observed yet.

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