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NFL Draft 2019: The most underrated player in every position you should want your team to take

The importance of the NFL draft cannot be overstated. In a lucrative as the NFL, being able to find cheap, productive talent consistently is an important part of building a successful franchise. The NFL draft from 2019 starts on Thursday night, and while it will be through Saturday, it is obviously Round 1 that most people enjoy the most. In fact, the first round is the only round most mock drafts. That's when the best players are taken, and it's the round where Roger Goodell stands on stage and gives players hugs after they are selected. But calling the first round selects the "best players" an assumption more than a proven fact &#821 1; a trained assumption but an assumption anyway. Every year, there are plenty of players taken in later rounds that become stars for their teams, or if not stars, fundamental pieces. For example, in the last five extracts (since 2014), 25 players were prepared in the third round or later, which continued to become Pro Bowlers. The names like Trai Turner (Round 3, Pick 92), Tyreek Hill (Round 5, Pickc 165), Alvin Kamara (Round 3, Pick 67), Roof Prescott (Round 4, Pick 135), David Johnson (Round 3, Pick 86 ) and George Kittle (Round 5, Pick 146) to name a few. Many more have become displaced starters on their respective teams. In other words, it is players who do not appear in the mock draft or receive a ton of pre-draft hype before their selection but could…

The importance of the NFL draft cannot be overstated. In a lucrative as the NFL, being able to find cheap, productive talent consistently is an important part of building a successful franchise. The NFL draft from 2019 starts on Thursday night, and while it will be through Saturday, it is obviously Round 1 that most people enjoy the most. In fact, the first round is the only round most mock drafts. That’s when the best players are taken, and it’s the round where Roger Goodell stands on stage and gives players hugs after they are selected.

But calling the first round selects the “best players” an assumption more than a proven fact &#821

1; a trained assumption but an assumption anyway. Every year, there are plenty of players taken in later rounds that become stars for their teams, or if not stars, fundamental pieces. For example, in the last five extracts (since 2014), 25 players were prepared in the third round or later, which continued to become Pro Bowlers. The names like Trai Turner (Round 3, Pick 92), Tyreek Hill (Round 5, Pickc 165), Alvin Kamara (Round 3, Pick 67), Roof Prescott (Round 4, Pick 135), David Johnson (Round 3, Pick 86 ) and George Kittle (Round 5, Pick 146) to name a few. Many more have become displaced starters on their respective teams.

In other words, it is players who do not appear in the mock draft or receive a ton of pre-draft hype before their selection but could continue to become productive NFL players. I have looked at many of these players through college, and I have been studying them in recent months, both by watching movies and by statistical analysis. I have chosen a player in each position group that I believe will not be prepared before the third round which I think is most likely to have productive NFL career.

We’ll start with the quarterback with one of my favorite uncured players in this draft.

QB Will Grier, West Virginia

In a draft where I know almost all of the quarterback prospects, it is more than likely to be backed up at the NFL level, Grier is one outside Kyler Murray-Dwayne Haskins tier I believe has the best chance of developing into a solid NFL starter. We see that every season the NFL team falls in love with size, armor and only looks like an NFL QB, and it gets them in trouble. This year I believe these QBs are Drew Lock and Daniel Jones, both of which have attractive potential but lacked in accuracy in college.

Then there is Grier, who was not only productive in college as a starter but both have a strong and precise arm. If there is one thing I think law is overlooked when evaluating quarterbacks, it is their accuracy as a bowler. You can do things to improve it on the next level, but for the most part you are either accurate or not.

Now none of this is saying Grier is a perfect prospect. He needs to develop. He shows intelligence before he is able to diagnose the defense and find his first reading. Then things tend to be quick. Amazingly, due to falling to the third round can benefit Grier. He will not be drafted in a place where teams feel pressured to put him on the field and let him sink or swim. He should be in a place that allows him to sit and learn for a year or two, and I think it will help him deal with his shortcomings. He has shown a lot of ability to make me believe that some teams will get him in the third round and he will be much more valuable than some of the QBs likely to go before him.

RB Justice Hill, Oklahoma State

It is difficult to find an underestimated or undervalued running perspective because, for the most part, almost everyone is undervalued or undervalued these days. The position has become so fungible in many minds that many talented players are thoughtful.

In a world of reflection, Hill can be my favorite no one notices. His size is a drawback to teams evaluating him, as he measured at 5-foot and 190 pounds at the NFL Combine. What I love about him, however, is that despite his size, he is not ineffective between the tackles. He also shows great views on finding the hole and hitting it, and he has good balance, so he can take hits and bounce off them without losing much about any speed. He was not asked to capture many passports in Oklahoma State’s offensive, and it leaves questions about his ability as a prisoner, but I believe there is potential there. Where his size hurts him, he is in passport blocking. I’m not sure he is strong enough to be effective there, but he has been willing to try, and sometimes it’s half the battle.

WR Deebo Samuel, South Carolina

Deebo Samuel will go on the second or third day of the draft and be a productive slot in the NFL. I am convinced of this. He seems like he was created for the role, even though he most played outside in South Carolina.

The things I’m looking for in receivers more than their size or speed (they are important, but I think we tend to focus on them too much) are their ability as a route runner and their ability to find holes in a defense. Samuel does both well. He has excellent quick-cut speed, which is why he thinks he will be so effective in the track, and he shows the ability to diagnose defenses and find soft spots. He can’t (or doesn’t) block much for you in the driving game, but I don’t care. I’m not writing him to block, but if he could, it would be good too.

TE Foster Moreau, LSU

The narrow end position has been developed in recent years thanks to Rob Gronkowski. Since Gronk came, every team in the NFL has been trying to find its version of Gronk, and they have failed miserably. That’s because when teams are looking for their Gronk, they are looking for giant athletic freaks who can create unfair matches in the matching game both in-line and in the slot. What they ignore is that Gronk was also a brilliant in-line blocker, making it even more difficult for defense to match the patriots’ crimes.

In this draft, Iowa’s T.J. Hockenson strikes me as the most “Gronk-like” for his ability to do everything. I don’t know the same thing about Noah Fant or Irv Smith. Then there is Moreau, who showed at LSU that he could stop and block and do well. In fact, I have no doubt that he will be able to perform as a blocking end in the NFL. I also think he will develop as a “catch catcher”. He does not have great speed or speed and will not burn many linebackers deeply, but he has good hands and shows intelligence in using his body to protect defenders from the ball. He caught 46 passes for 550 meters and 5 touchdowns the last two seasons at LSU, so it’s not like it’s a strange concept for him. He is not Gronk, nor will he, but he will be a steal for someone in the middle rounds.

OL Max Scharping, Northern Illinois

As a Tuesday night football expert, I have seen lots of Northern Illinois games. Ironically, during these games it was Northern Illinois defensive than Sutton Smith who received most of the broadcast’s attention, well, he deserves it. He was extremely productive. But it was always Scharping who caught my eye while looking at the huskies. He played the left tackle, and he succeeded there against MAC competition. I think at the NFL level he has a shot at playing on the left side, but he may be better suited to the right side.

He has a good base, uses excellent technology, and he is strong. He is also a bit meaningful which is something I have always had in my offensive linemen. He gets a little happy with his hands sometimes, and in MAC he often came away with it so it didn’t hurt him, but he must work on it at the NFL level. Anyway, he is a guy who can be formulated later that ends as an NFL starter who may not go to a lot of Pro Bowls but can have a stable career.

Collier is challenging to assess DL LJ Collier, TCU

because he did not play a lot on the TCU. He is also somewhat positionless. For me, he is best as a fifth technique in a 3-4, but he sometimes played on outside linebacker with the TCU. He is not the kind of guy who will surprise you with his shirt off, but he is strong, and he has long arms – arms that he uses very well to take the hands of the offensive linemen and steer the scrimmage line. Although he does not have the fast speed you want to look for in a typical edge rusher, he uses these arms and strength and bulls can rush effectively.

All these are good things, but what I love most about Collier is his engine. When you saw TCU’s defense last season, he always went full speed. He didn’t take off playing, and he wasn’t afraid to mix it up either. I love it in a defensive line man as much as I do an offensive line man. Collier does not get the attention that so many of the other edge crushers and defensive linemen in this draft do, and I get it because he will not wow you with his moves. But he is a football player.

LB Ben Burr-Kirven, Washington

You will notice a running theme with the players I like about defense. Yes, athletics, speed, strength and skill are all important things for any player. In defense, however, it is a mentality that I am looking for, and the Burr-Kirven is another example of it. He is not exactly big at 6 feet and 230 pounds, but he is flying around in the field with a high engine and he is able to cope. They are not always the finest tacklers, but he ends most of them.

The NFL’s current era has seen crimes after collegial crimes and scattered defenses. You see the team in nickel more than you see them in their basic sets these days, and I think the Burr-Kirven is someone who benefits from it. He can get the sideline to the sideline and shows signs of having the type of coverage you need from your linebacker today if he will stay in the field of your nickel kit. If it is a weakness, he has problems with the traffic because of his size, and he is not very excited to enter a backfield that stops driving or in a rush. He is more east-west than north-south.

CB Ugochukwu Amadi, Oregon

Don’t worry, you can call him “Ugo”. Whatever you want to call him, I believe Amadi profiles as an excellent nickel corner in the NFL, which only gets more valuable during the day. He played part of a hybrid role in Oregon between corners and free security, and could possibly do both in the NFL, but with his size (5-199 pounds) and shorter speed, I think he is best suited to the slot role role in which he can reflect guys, and he has shown good ball instincts.

Some teams may be afraid of the 4.51 40 he ran in the combination, but Amadi plays faster than the speed and his agility and ability. Changing directions quickly helps cover the lack of top speed. Likewise, he’s just smart defensive and has good instincts. He has shortcomings in the running game because of his size. It limits his draft to layers because a corner of the castle will have to help run sometimes as well.

S Jaquan Johnson, Miami

Johnson will not be the most busy player in his defense, nor will he be the highest paid player, but he could quickly become the leader of it. If he got faster (he ran 4.69 in the combination) he would probably shave up hooks because he is just a smart instinctual player with a high engine. Someone who is not afraid to come up and hit someone when he needs but at the same time can fall into the coverage.

When I look at Johnson I can’t help but he was born a decade or two too late, because he would have been a perfect NFL security long ago. But still I think he will be a good NFL player who is a valuable member of a good defense. He is the kind of player who may not be the best player in your defense, but he will make everyone around him look better. I like Johnson better than a few of the safeguards projected to move on.

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