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New horizons see no moons or rings around Ultima Thule, Opts for Primary Flyby Path | Exploration of space

After several weeks of sensitive searches for rings, tiny moons and other potential hazards around 2014 MU69, a Kuiper belt item called Ultima Thule, the prison member New Horizons Risk Watch Team "all ready" for spacecraft left on a level like it takes about 2 200 miles from Ultima Thule instead of a varied detour that would have pushed it three times further. An artist's impression of New Horizons encountering Ultima Thule. Image credits: NASA / Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory / Southwest Research Institute / Alex Parker. "New Horizons are now focusing on the optimum airfield, three times closer than we flew to Pluto. Ultima, here we come," said New Horizons main researcher, Dr. Alan Stern, researcher at the Southwest Research Institute. New Horizons will make its historic approach to Ultima Thule at 12:33 AM EST January 1, 2019. With the probe that holds about 31,500 km / h, a particle as small as a riskor can be fatal to the piano probe. New Horizon's risk watch team had been using spacecraft's most powerful telescope camera, Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI), to look for potential hazards. The decision whether the probe should be held at its original course or divert to a distant aerodrome, which would have produced less detailed data, must be done this week since the last opportunity to maneuver the spacecraft on another route every yesterday 18 December 2018 . This image of Ultima Thule (light yellow spot in the middle) was made by combining hundreds…

After several weeks of sensitive searches for rings, tiny moons and other potential hazards around 2014 MU69, a Kuiper belt item called Ultima Thule, the prison member New Horizons Risk Watch Team “all ready” for spacecraft left on a level like it takes about 2 200 miles from Ultima Thule instead of a varied detour that would have pushed it three times further.

An artist’s impression of New Horizons encountering Ultima Thule. Image credits: NASA / Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory / Southwest Research Institute / Alex Parker.

“New Horizons are now focusing on the optimum airfield, three times closer than we flew to Pluto. Ultima, here we come,” said New Horizons main researcher, Dr. Alan Stern, researcher at the Southwest Research Institute.

New Horizons will make its historic approach to Ultima Thule at 12:33 AM EST January 1, 2019.

With the probe that holds about 31,500 km / h, a particle as small as a riskor can be fatal to the piano probe.

New Horizon’s risk watch team had been using spacecraft’s most powerful telescope camera, Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI), to look for potential hazards.

The decision whether the probe should be held at its original course or divert to a distant aerodrome, which would have produced less detailed data, must be done this week since the last opportunity to maneuver the spacecraft on another route every yesterday 18 December 2018 .

This image of Ultima Thule (light yellow spot in the middle) was made by combining hundreds of pictures taken between August and mid December by New Horizon’s long line Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI). The image has been dyed with deep blue for the darkest regions and yellow for the brightest. The two possible flight distances of New Horizons are indicated by the two concentric circles. The mission has decided to fly along the closer to the target point marked by an X. Individual images contain many background stars, but by combining images taken at various distances from Ultima Thule most stars can be identified and removed. However, some of them leave tracks that can be seen as weak circles radiating away from the target point. Image credits: NASA / Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory / Southwest Research Institute.

Any ring structure that reflects only five 10 million of sunlight falling on it would have been visible in the pictures, as well as some moons more than about 2

They continue to look for rings or moons that are very close to Ultima Thule, but they would not pose any risk.

“Our team feels like riding together with spacecraft, as if we were marching up at the hustle and bustle of a ship and looking for dangers ahead,” said Hazard’s team leader Dr. Mark Showalter, from the SETI Institute.

“We were in full agreement that spacecraft should be on the nearest track and mission management accepted our recommendation.”

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