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New evidence shows that Tornado does not form the way researchers have always thought

Historically, tornadoes are believed to come from the clouds and when turbulent fingers down to earth. But now a team of climatologists has shown that this "top-down" model of tornadogs can actually be wrong. Yep. Tornados, their research has found form from scratch. Tornados can form surprisingly fast in just a few minutes. Therefore, it's not easy to catch birth, especially near the ground where trees and houses can get in the way. Meteorologist Jana Houser from Ohio University has hunted them for several years. Using a fast-scanning mobile Doppler radar, she was able to get comprehensive data on four tornados born of rare and magnificent (and dangerous) supercells. 1 9659003] [embedded content] These were two small years in 2012, outside of Galatia and Russell, Kansas, and recorded 1 out of 5 on Enhanced Fujita tornado intensity scale; an EF3 near El Reno, Oklahoma 2011; and a special monster that hit near El Reno 2013, an EF5 which is 4.2 kilometers is the largest tornado ever measured. And not one of them began in heaven according to Houser and her team data. They started with the 2013 El Reno tornado. Due to the rock's point of view, they could get what they called a "never-seen data set" under tornadogs, as low as 10 meters above the ground. In addition, storm hunters participated in droves – which also led to a variety of photographic data. The team had access to hundreds of photographs of the event, which they compared to their…

Historically, tornadoes are believed to come from the clouds and when turbulent fingers down to earth. But now a team of climatologists has shown that this “top-down” model of tornadogs can actually be wrong.

Yep. Tornados, their research has found form from scratch.

Tornados can form surprisingly fast in just a few minutes. Therefore, it’s not easy to catch birth, especially near the ground where trees and houses can get in the way. Meteorologist Jana Houser from Ohio University has hunted them for several years.

Using a fast-scanning mobile Doppler radar, she was able to get comprehensive data on four tornados born of rare and magnificent (and dangerous) supercells. 1

9659003]

These were two small years in 2012, outside of Galatia and Russell, Kansas, and recorded 1 out of 5 on Enhanced Fujita tornado intensity scale; an EF3 near El Reno, Oklahoma 2011; and a special monster that hit near El Reno 2013, an EF5 which is 4.2 kilometers is the largest tornado ever measured.

And not one of them began in heaven according to Houser and her team data.

They started with the 2013 El Reno tornado. Due to the rock’s point of view, they could get what they called a “never-seen data set” under tornadogs, as low as 10 meters above the ground.

In addition, storm hunters participated in droves – which also led to a variety of photographic data. The team had access to hundreds of photographs of the event, which they compared to their radar measurements of wind speed.

And it was here that became curious: because the photographs showed a clear tornado funnel on the ground before radar data showed some rotation at higher heights. So they went back to their radar data and analyzed it again, found rotation on the ground before it was materialized in the clouds.

Data sets from the other three turndowns showed similar patterns, although 2011 Renren-tornado 2011 showed rotation at a number of different elevations simultaneously. It indicates that there may be different tornadogenes, but it did not begin in the sky and worked down.

“It seems that in many cases” the team wrote in its abstract “tornadic-strength rotation developed either at near ground levels first or at the same time in the depth of the tornado-bearing layer.”

Of course, four are quite a small sample size given that on average more than 1,000 tornades are registered in the United States each year.

But considering that people are injured or killed every year by these storms, they know how they form can help protect people. Currently, tornado detection is based on wind velocity in the clouds. If their formation begins closer to the ground – and if it can be detected – it can add valuable seconds to early tornado alerts.

More data and data analysis are likely to be required. But Houser and her team have tornadoes in the tail.

The team presented its research on December 14 at the American Geophysical Union 2018 meeting
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