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NASA sent Juno to Jupiter 2011. It got back artwork

NASA sent Juno spacecraft to Jupiter 2011. It took some time for Juno to get there – but it was delivered. The photos were taken by spacecraft at its 16th near airport on October 29, NASA Juno traveled for years and did not reach Jupiter until July 2016. The spacecraft was launched so that researchers could study Jupiter's composition and evolution, and they are happy about what they found. Jupiter is the fifth planet from the sun and is the largest planet in the solar system, by far. "The general theme of our discoveries is really how different Jupiter looked from what we expected," said Scott Bolton, Juno chief researcher, from the Southwest Research Institute in San Antonio when the first pictures were revealed in May of May. "This is a close-up and personal look at Jupiter. We thought it was uniform inside and relatively boring. What we find is anything but that." The watercolor swirls in this picture are clouds in Jupiter's north-tempered tempered belt, says NASA. And like clouds on earth, people seek forms within them. NASA got the game going. But others were quick to follow observations ranging from an octopus to a bird. No reports of an airplane or superman yet. But NASA washed pictures that apparently are part of dolphins. NASA said that on December 21 , it will mark halfway through the data collection of Juno's primary mission. So hopefully, more fascinating pictures will be coming, and maybe lazy sundays in the future will…

NASA sent Juno spacecraft to Jupiter 2011. It took some time for Juno to get there – but it was delivered.

The photos were taken by spacecraft at its 16th near airport on October 29, NASA

Juno traveled for years and did not reach Jupiter until July 2016. The spacecraft was launched so that researchers could study Jupiter’s composition and evolution, and they are happy about what they found. Jupiter is the fifth planet from the sun and is the largest planet in the solar system, by far.

“The general theme of our discoveries is really how different Jupiter looked from what we expected,” said Scott Bolton, Juno chief researcher, from the Southwest Research Institute in San Antonio when the first pictures were revealed in May of May. “This is a close-up and personal look at Jupiter. We thought it was uniform inside and relatively boring. What we find is anything but that.”

The watercolor swirls in this picture are clouds in Jupiter’s north-tempered tempered belt, says NASA.

And like clouds on earth, people seek forms within them.

NASA got the game going.

But others were quick to follow observations ranging from an octopus to a bird.

No reports of an airplane or superman yet. But NASA washed pictures that apparently are part of dolphins.

NASA said that on December 21

, it will mark halfway through the data collection of Juno’s primary mission. So hopefully, more fascinating pictures will be coming, and maybe lazy sundays in the future will take the cloud staring from the park to outer space.


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