Categories: world

NASA captures spell binding images of supersonic shockwaves that interact in flight

With the aid of newly upgraded aerial photography technology that took 10 years to develop, NASA's ethereal images show for the first time the interaction of shockwaves from two in-flight supersonic aircraft. The images depict two T-38 supersonic jets from the US Air Force during a test flight from the research center at Edwards Air Force Base in California. "What's interesting is that if you look at the back T-38, you see these shocks kind of interaction in a curve," says Neal Smith, a research engineer at NASA. "This is because the subsequent T-38 flies in the wake of the leading aircraft, so the shocks will be shaped differently. These data will really help us deepen our understanding of how these shocks interact. "Shockwaves produced by supersonic aircraft are responsible for creating supersonic barriers as they merge as they travel through the atmosphere, which has led to limitations on breaking the sound barrier. Over land, the possibility of flying supersonic without a sonic boom can one day result in the lifting of current limits on supersonic flight over land. "I'm ecstatic about how these images turned out," JT Heineck, a researcher at NASA's Ames Research Center, said in a statement. "We never dreamed it would be of course, this beautiful. " " With this upgraded system, we have, on the order of magnitude, improved both our d speed and quality of previous research. " The new photographic technology made it possible for researchers to capture three times more data compared…

With the aid of newly upgraded aerial photography technology that took 10 years to develop, NASA’s ethereal images show for the first time the interaction of shockwaves from two in-flight supersonic aircraft.

The images depict two T-38 supersonic jets from the US Air Force during a test flight from the research center at Edwards Air Force Base in California.

“What’s interesting is that if you look at the back T-38, you see these shocks kind of interaction in a curve,” says Neal Smith, a research engineer at NASA. “This is because the subsequent T-38 flies in the wake of the leading aircraft, so the shocks will be shaped differently. These data will really help us deepen our understanding of how these shocks interact. “Shockwaves produced by supersonic aircraft are responsible for creating supersonic barriers as they merge as they travel through the atmosphere, which has led to limitations on breaking the sound barrier. Over land, the possibility of flying supersonic without a sonic boom can one day result in the lifting of current limits on supersonic flight over land.

 NASA's upgraded photo technology allows researchers to hijack 1400 frames per second.

“I’m ecstatic about how these images turned out,” JT Heineck, a researcher at NASA’s Ames Research Center, said in a statement. “We never dreamed it would be of course, this beautiful. “

” With this upgraded system, we have, on the order of magnitude, improved both our d speed and quality of previous research. “

 NASA uses the collected data as part of their development of the X-59 Quiet SuperSonic Technology X plane, which they hope will produce just a quiet rumble rather than a sonic boom.

The new photographic technology made it possible for researchers to capture three times more data compared to previous tests, which will play a key role in NASA’s development of the X-59 Quiet SuperSonic Technology X plane.

This aircraft will allow NASA to fly supersonic while producing shockwaves in a way that they produce “just a calm rumble” rather than a sonic boom.

“We see a level of physical detail here that I don’t think anyone has ever seen before,” says Dan Banks, a senior research engineer at NASA. “I’m just looking at data for the first time, I think things worked better than we thought. This is a very big step.”

 2 astronauts are scheduled for the first spacewalk in history

Images required precision flight from US Air Force pilots as supersonic jets travel about 30 meters apart so that shock waves from their aircraft would interact.

The images were captured from a NASA B-200 King Air aircraft using photographic techniques that allowed researchers to collect 1400 frames per second flew in a 30,000 foot pattern, observing the T-38s passing about 2000 meters under it.


Source link

Share
Published by
Faela