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Murder in the Brussels Jewish Museum: Mehdi Nemmouche guilty

WhichAFPCaptionsThis file photo of Nemmouche was released in 2014 – and he has not been photographed at trial He traveled to Syria in 2013 for a year, during which time he allegedly fought for a jihadist group in the country's civil war. Investigators say he met Najim Laachraoui, who was a suicide bomber in the Brussels airport attack of March 2016, who killed 32 people. Four French people held hostages in Syria, claiming they were guarded by both Laachraoui and Nemmouche during their captivity. Links have also been drawn between Laachraoui's group and the person who carried out the Paris bombings in November 2015. [19659007] Nemmouche was extradited to Belgium to meet charges attached to the museum's shooting, but may also be subject to trial in France on allegations. he was involved in the captivity of the French prisoner. Intimidation at the beginning The trial was dramatic from Security was introduced to match it for the trial of the imprisoned jihadist Salah Abdeslam, the only surviving member of the 2015 Paris attacks. Day after that, a lawyer who represented a witness started reporting his laptop and some paperwork on the case had been stolen from his office. A baseball bat and replica gun were left in place – some prosecutor considered a threat. In the quay the next day, Nem Mouche condemned the attempted intimidation – and the witness, 81-year-old Chilean artist Clara Billeke Villalobos, continued to testify. The children of the victims speak of the court Next came the…

Which
AFP

Captions

This file photo of Nemmouche was released in 2014 – and he has not been photographed at trial

He traveled to Syria in 2013 for a year, during which time he allegedly fought for a jihadist group in the country’s civil war.

Investigators say he met Najim Laachraoui, who was a suicide bomber in the Brussels airport attack of March 2016, who killed 32 people.

Four French people held hostages in Syria, claiming they were guarded by both Laachraoui and Nemmouche during their captivity.

Links have also been drawn between Laachraoui’s group and the person who carried out the Paris bombings in November 2015. [19659007] Nemmouche was extradited to Belgium to meet charges attached to the museum’s shooting, but may also be subject to trial in France on allegations. he was involved in the captivity of the French prisoner.

Intimidation at the beginning

The trial was dramatic from

Security was introduced to match it for the trial of the imprisoned jihadist Salah Abdeslam, the only surviving member of the 2015 Paris attacks.

Day after that, a lawyer who represented a witness started reporting his laptop and some paperwork on the case had been stolen from his office.

A baseball bat and replica gun were left in place – some prosecutor considered a threat.

In the quay the next day, Nem Mouche condemned the attempted intimidation – and the witness, 81-year-old Chilean artist Clara Billeke Villalobos, continued to testify.

The children of the victims speak of the court

Next came the orphans of Miriam and Emmanuel Riva, tourists from Israel who were killed in the attack. The couple had celebrated their 18th anniversary.

Ayalet, 19 and Shira, 21, described a mother “devoted to her family” and a modest father who “loved to travel”.

“Their childhood has been stolen from them,” one of their counsel told the court, “which they have had to grow up early.”

Listening to testimony in the quay, Nemmouche remained impassive and looked away

Image copyright
Reuters

Captions

Weapons used in the attack were shown in court as evidence

Three weeks in negotiations, jurors were shown video by Nemmouche in custody after his arrest.

The Belgian newspaper Le Soir described it as showing an “arrogant” Nemmouche in front of the police with a “contemptuous smile”, arms folding.

He repeats his right to be silent over and over again, barely succeeding in suppressing a smile.

“This video stinks of bad faith and sweating guilt,” says the lawyer representing the museum Adrian Masset.

Dramatic testimony from Syria

Four French journalists were kidnapped in June 2013 and hosted by the IS group in the northern city of Aleppo until April 2014.

Two of them appeared in court – Nemmouche pointed out as their scavengers. 19659007] Nicolas Henin told the court: “I have absolutely no doubt that Mehdi Nemmouche who is present here was my prison and torture in Syria under the name Abu Omar.”

He described him as “sadistic, playful and narcissistic”.

His charity league Didier Francois, told lawyers Nemmouche had beaten him dozens of times with a truncheon.

But Nemmouche’s lawyers said the journalists’ testimony constituted a “stunt” and a “trial in a trial” because their kidnapping is an object

“Ultra-radicalized”

At the end of February, prosecutor Bernard Michel was ready to summarize his case and request a guilty judgment.

He told the court Nemmouche was “not simply radicalized but ultra radicalized”.

“If you attack a museum with a combat weapon is not violent and wild, nothing will ever be violent and willful,” he said. “We are looking at one of the most serious crimes.”

“For the killer, for Mehdi Nemmouche, the victim’s identity meant a little,” he added.

“The purpose was simply that there would be sacrifices. Everything was premeditated.”

An unlikely Lebanese-Iranian-Israeli plot

The final argument from the defense is described by some as “exaggerated”, as it woven a conspiracy web with foreign intelligence and murder.

Courtoy, Nemmouche’s lawyer, suggested that his client be recruited in Lebanon in January 2013 by Iranian or Lebanese intelligence to become a member of the IS.

According to the court, the murder was not an IS attack, but a “targeted execution of Mossad agents” – a reference to the Israeli intelligence service which he claimed Israelis couples belonged to. Death was performed by an unknown person, he said.

Image copyright
Reuters

Captions

Nemmouche’s lawyer Sebastien Courtoy presented an alleged spy plot

But judges who investigated the mouse attack last month told the court that there was no evidence to support any link to Mossad.

Courtoy claimed that it was in this supposed dual agent capacity that Nemmouche was jailer from the French journalists, but he claimed that they were never abused.

He said Nemmouche “went outside the radar at the end of 2013” after British jihadists suspected him “getting involved in double trade”.

When he returned to Europe, he probably tried to quit the spy group, “who simply tried to use him”.

“Do these people really own Iranian intelligence?” Mr Courtoy softened. “You can see that they are active in Brussels, France, that they have plans to kill people,” he said.

“This is a case of state terrorism,” he added.

Thereafter, Courtoy explained that he could not provide further clarification because he did not “want an 80-second episode” in his own home – a reference to the 80 seconds it took the killer to attack the museum.

He asked the jury to “not make a mistake” by judging Nemmouche and repeating that he had been “established”.

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